Nov. 30, 2021

NSFW Pod 025 - Lee Richardson

NSFW Pod 025 - Lee Richardson

In this episode, we interviewed Lee Richardson.  Lee is a military veteran who has been published in Hustler and Penthouse, owner and creator of Shutterfun, and hasn't found anyone who is putting on larger nude photography events in the world! Lee is a co-owner of Melt Models in Florida, and has a new modeling training program they're getting off the ground.
We discuss the Homestead Beauties event and other events he has held in the last several years, modeling agencies, and the new training program.


In this episode, we interviewed Lee Richardson.  Lee is a military veteran who has been published in Hustler and Penthouse, owner and creator of Shutterfun, and hasn't found anyone who is putting on larger nude photography events in the world! Lee is a co-owner of Melt Models in Florida, and has a new modeling training program they're getting off the ground.

We discuss the Homestead Beauties event and other events he has held in the last several years, modeling agencies, and the new training program.  

Lee can be found online at:
Instagram - leerichardsonphoto
Instagram - themeltmodels
Twitter - themeltmodels
Shutter Fun - http://www.shutterfun.com/
Melt Models - https://www.meltmodels.com/
Making Models Pro - https://www.makingmodelspro.com/

Help us reach new listeners by rating us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or your favorite place you get podcasts!  Visit us at https://www.thensfwphotographypodcast.com/

Transcript

Transcript created by AI via Descript.  There are errors in the AI Transcription, and it should not be considered an authoritative source.  It is provided anyways for accessibility SEO.

[00:00:00] Matthew Holliday: Good day, everyone. And welcome back to then not safe for work photography podcast. There are thousands of models and photographers, creating adult content, using modern platforms and taking control of their own creative lives. Today we're interviewing Lee Richardson, Lee as a military veteran, who has been published in hustler and penthouse. 

He's the owner and creator of shutterfun. And hasn't found anyone who was putting on larger nude photography events in the world. He is a co-owner of Mount model's in Florida and has a new modeling and training program. They're getting off the ground. Let's talk, you're talking about doing you're a busy man. 

Thanks for coming on the podcast. How's your week?  

[00:00:46] Lee Richardson: I've been busy as usual. How's your day? How's your week going? 

[00:00:50] Matthew Holliday: Not nearly so busy. So after I interviewed Bella Donna photo, a couple of weeks ago, Lee reached out to me on Instagram and mentioned he runs the event we discussed with Joe. And that event is of course a homestead beauties event that's in Virginia. So I know there's a bunch of other things we want to get into, and we're definitely getting into the event, but quick as like a quick intro, how did you get into photographing models?  

[00:01:17] Lee Richardson: Oh man. Oh it's probably been about 10 years ago. When I was in the military, I was luckily enough able to be stationed in Hawaii. And, I had one of those little waterproof point and shoot cameras and they, it was just like, crappy quality and, I was like, I gotta get a new camera. 

So I went to best buy. I got me a T T1 Canon. Really. I started this shooting landscape, I started shooting mountain. Sunsets and beaches. And then I found myself drawn to like, just shooting random things on the beach. Like people holding their hands, walking down the beach girls in bikinis playing volleyball, just like random stuff like that. 

And it drawn me more to shooting people. And so a buddy of mine happened to be in photography. He's oh, you should get a model. Ma'am, and just you can talk to models and, makeup artists and stuff like that. And yeah, I joined it and, had some pictures I put up there and a model reached out to me and it's actually some of my best work. 

I got really lucky. I rented a rent, I rented a lens, rented a light. And then the tripod around the trigger found a model. She was new. I was new or Hey, let's just get better. And so we. And, do a little bikini shoot on like a playground thing. It was, different. I was like, okay. 

Playground or bikini, whatever, but it was Y and yeah, we shot. And I was like, yeah, I really like this. And then her friend told her friend at work and her friend wanted me to shoot her. And it got into like, when we were shooting her and her friend was like, yeah, can you take some like implied kind of Nudie pictures for my boyfriend. 

And I'm like, oh, okay. I've never done that before, but okay, sure. So shot, those came out great. Learn how to this mute tubing, Photoshop stuff, when you're first starting, you just YouTube, everything. And so had some great pictures there and we shot a couple more times. And then I ended up getting stationed in Washington, DC by about six months later. 

So I had to leave Hawaii right before I got really into photography and I found meetup.com. So I joined that and I found some photography. And found some work shops that were in the area started going to those. Some of them were great. Some of them were talk talk, and then shoot the model for five minutes. 

And then you're done. And I'm like that was a waste of time. But then some of them are, I learned, like I saw, I watched everybody watch how they shot, watched how they set up lighting. Why are you doing this, lighting, this setting, this that, I just asked him a lot of questions and. 

I got into my own workshop. I was like, you know what? I like this piece of this workshop. I like this part of that workshop. I'm going to make mine more shooting, less talking and just, so I just started doing my own workshops. And in my house, actually in DC, I set up a, a backdrop and, made a meet up group and it started to grow and I kinda was cheaper than everyone else. 

So everyone went to my groups instead of everyone else's there. And then it just got bigger and bigger. So yeah, it just was a learning experience for me. And then I learned how to do the lighting and then I learned how to make my own workshop, my own groups, and it just got bigger and bigger over the years. 

And now it's huge. 

[00:04:23] Matthew Holliday: That's super exciting. Yeah, that's really interesting. I've been, I've just getting into the kind of the event space myself over the last few months. I've never really done it before. So this is all new to me.  

[00:04:32] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Yeah. It's meetup was a great platform. It still is a great platform. Unfortunately my meetup got shut down because someone posted a nude picture and they kinda like somewhere in the terms and agreements and they just add about 1200 people in my group and they just shut me down. So I had just prayed a whole new one and now I've got about three or 400 back again. 

But luckily I had an email list with everybody, so I try to keep everybody in the loop whoever I have, but yeah, so far it's been pretty wild. It's been a wild couple of five or six years.  

[00:05:03] Matthew Holliday: So that actually makes it gives me a question because this is something that's come up a couple of times more so for models and for photographers, where if they get kicked off of Instagram, they lose contact with all their followers, which is the same thing that happened to you with meetup. 

How do you had the email list, so you were able to reach back out to them. What's the best method you found for trying to keep up with all those photographers that might want to attend your events as are like a Facebook group and Instagram group? Or is it all email now?  

[00:05:29] Lee Richardson: Yeah. So for me, a lot of photographers are email-based they're old school models, a lot of Instagram stuff, but for me, what I did what happened years ago, about five or six years ago, beat up, shut down all the photography groups. Like no matter what they just, they said, Hey, you gotta, you have a 10 day window. 

We're shutting everything down because I'm assuming something happened. Someone was maybe under grade or something happened where, something happened in some, one of the groups that they just said, we're cutting it, we're killing it off. So that was my chance. That's when I said, okay, I need to make my own website. 

So I made shutter fun.com and I grabbed everyone's email. I said, Hey, everyone send me your email. Everyone contacted me, and I put it on the email list and I put, moved everybody to my website. I said, Hey, we're moving from meetup to my website. Go to there and everyone dumped over and has been, following that sense, still use the meet up every so often. 

But I would say, yeah, a mailchimp.com is a great resource, fairly affordable. It can make an email list. You can track where it goes, who you can target certain people in certain areas. So like for traveling models, if you have a thousand photographers in your email list, you can say, I want a message, an email, only people in Florida, bam. 

And then it goes right to there cause it tracks their IP address. So it, it knows  

where they are. Yeah. So it's a really good really good platform to use for kind of if you're a traveling model, if that makes sense, or if I need to just message everybody or somebody or certain people in Florida or Miami or whatever, so it's a good platform. I use a lot.  

[00:06:57] Matthew Holliday: That's really cool. Yeah. 

I have a, I know that's been a common complaint amongst everybody's talked about. I think the one thing that they're not cracking down on, somebody talked about using a telegram group  

[00:07:08] Lee Richardson: Yeah. I heard about that too. Yeah. Yeah. Telegram was like an app or something, but yeah it's it works. I haven't really used too much, but yeah, I was,  

[00:07:16] Matthew Holliday: not a social media. I'm not a social media  

[00:07:18] Lee Richardson: yeah. I wouldn't say old school email is the way to go or just text messaging. There's some really good texting apps. And as part of our mentoring program we educate the models on and it goes to a couple of great apps that basically you use your contact lists, you save them, however you want to save their names. 

As Joe in Florida, John and Texas. And you can just pick through whoever you want and it just mass, Texas, everybody, Hey, I'm coming to Florida just November, this December that, and it just, boom. It goes all out at once. No, daddy has another platform is really good. I use that sometimes. So as you get text messages, it's the newer way. If people that, don't use the email system, but text messages, it's the next days Instagram doesn't have anything like that. Facebook doesn't really have anything like that unless you have a group or a, some kind of page that you use or something. 

[00:08:04] Matthew Holliday: Gotcha. Yeah. That makes sense. So you already talked a little bit about how you got into started with doing the events. So you run two right now, correct? There's homestead beauties, and what's the other one? 

[00:08:15] Lee Richardson: Yeah. So it started when it started weirding and I kinda came up with something beauties and the fairest one was a cruise. And what we did was, I called it like cruising, beauties, and I just couldn't find a domain name that would work. And so I did cruise and beauties first, and it was literally like five models that I knew that were really close with. 

I was like, Hey, do you want to do a cruise? And if the photographers. Your way through the cruise, you want to go and shoot, like for, four or five hours, they're like, yeah, sure. Let's go on the cruise. We could, we had a couple of, like four or five photographers and it was like a one-to-one ratio. 

So it worked out perfectly. They did all shot with each other. They did all their own negotiating. If they want to shoot more hours, they paid them for that. And yeah, it worked out cool. And I was like, I can probably do something like this every year. So I just started thinking of where else in that when I was living in Washington DC at the time I had met up a model asking me to, to take her to a shoot at this re remote farm somewhere up in like Syria, Virginia, middle of nowhere took her there and I spell this beautiful farm. 

This is crazy farm. And I was just like, oh my God, this place is beautiful. So I shot a little bit with her, but she had someone else that she was meeting there. And we were there and I talked to the owner and I was like, Hey, You mind if I do a little workshop here, one time, he's yeah. 

Bring anybody you want, have some photographers that models up, he was a really cool guy Joe said Earl, and so yeah, I have a little five model the thing, and then a another did that. And then I was like, man, I can do this like more often, a little bit of a drive and couldn't do it like every week or something. 

I decided Hey, I started planning this event for like maybe 10 models, maybe 10 photographers, 20 photographers. And the first year it was a a pretty good success, did what they're used to doing at these events is where they would come. 

And then they would negotiate their own times and they would email the photographers and talk to, do all the negotiating. And I just supplied the place and it was such a mess. Everyone was looking for everybody. No one knew who was where and what, and it was just like, I'm like, oh my God, this is like a mess. 

I'm like running around trying to find people all the time. And the following a year, I was like, okay, I'm going to be in charge of the scheduling, the booking that way. Cause I'm a really organized guide and like some logistics, a lot in the military. So I was like, all right, I'm gonna make it like a scheduling plan. 

I'm going to have the photographers, pre-book the models ahead of time, months in advance. So that way they can pick what time, what day, who ran, where and then you can even add you know what they want them to wear what they want them to bring. If they have that. And so that just took off, amazingly, it was so smooth. 

It was great. Everyone knew where to go. I had scheduled for everybody, everyone knew who was, who named badges, it was just like super smooth. So it was, I'm a very organized kind of guy. So yeah. So since then every year it just got bigger and bigger the first year, I think, collectively the models made like 20 grand and this last year was we broke our record. 

Again, models made almost like $36,000 collectively total from the day, the entire event. Yeah. So it's just it's gotten bigger and bigger. And then we did a thing in Jamaica, found a nude resort there that we're a lot we're yeah. We're allowed to shoot there. So we did that. So it's almost been like three events a year. 

So homestead Jamaica, and then home sorry. The cruise, when the cruise shut down over COVID we kinda didn't do one last year, but we're working on one for December and January or January, depending on. And the timing and stuff. And then next year we're going to do homestead again and may, and yeah, it's just been super smooth. 

Everyone comes there, everything's organized, you can book the models right there. We have a big TV screen as a full, huge schedule. You can see who's where who's shooting with whom, although, you can just see. Yeah. So  

it's yeah,  

[00:11:52] Matthew Holliday: was one of the things I didn't understand. And I asked Joe about, and he educated me on cause I was like, I was just imagining chaos is like trying to find the model and be like, Hey, I want to shoot with you and everybody. yeah, 

But like I guess the first year was  

[00:12:04] Lee Richardson: yeah, exactly. And that's what a lot of the other events are. It's just chaos. And that's why I was like, ah, we can't do this. We gotta make it more organized. Otherwise I'll lose my head and it helps them, the models they on the property, the photographers they're right next door. Super organized, but yeah, Jamaica accrues as it gets a little bit more confusing where, by five schedules and, resorts, stuff, but it's very organized. 

Over the years we've learned something every year. I'm like, okay, next year we've got to do this better. We gotta do that better. We gotta do this better. 

[00:12:34] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. 

So I noticed that you did desert beauty is a couple of years. That's a shame. I love the Southwest. I think that would be where I would be most excited to go personally, but was that, does that one? Not make it not  

[00:12:46] Lee Richardson: Yeah. What it was, finding a property in, out there and finding a coat, an owner of a house, it was like, Hey, can we have, 10 naked girls running around and 10 photographers trying to shoot everywhere in your house? Like we did it once the first year was good. 

The second year some stuff got broke, some kind of stuff got moved around and he was just kinda eh, so it's just like finding that. Person that's nice to work with and let's use the property and don't worry, I'll fix it up, clean it don't worry, kind of thing. 

[00:13:15] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. Yeah. I gotcha. I'll definitely keep an eye on a website. If that one comes back up.  

[00:13:20] Lee Richardson: Yeah. I'm hoping that when you find another property in Arizona, is, does anybody knows a place in Arizona? Let me know. 

[00:13:27] Matthew Holliday: How did things go over 20, 21? I know that the event was outdoors so you didn't have to worry much about, cOVID transmitting and you had to cancel the cruise thing because of that. But did It did you guys have to, did it did it lead to increased attendance, decreased attendance? 

What was going on? 

[00:13:43] Lee Richardson: It went down a little bit. A lot of the, photographers are more older obviously in this day and age. They were a little skeptical, we had everything in place. We had our hand sanitizer, we had to shut our fund masks cause they wanna, use those where those, we were taking precautions. 

I exited everything was outside, minus the barn inside. But yeah, everything was pretty, pretty well handled. Everyone had a great time and yeah, it was a great success. I think a lot of events got canceled, but ours, I said, Nope, we're pushing on. We're going to make it work. Whether, if somebody, one person shows up or 20 people show up, we made it work 

[00:14:16] Matthew Holliday: You met, you've mentioned, I think that you try to keep the photographer model ratio about one-to-one that normal for events like this, or is that something you're specifically trying to do? 

[00:14:25] Lee Richardson: well for the crews. One-to-one is not the ideal ratio. I like to see, like if there's 10 models, I would love to see 20 photographers because then, the models make more money and the photographers have more people to shoot and stuff like that. Sometimes on our. Like the Jamaica or the cruise, it's a sponsor based type of deal where like they pick the model and they get a certain amount of hours and they pay for their entire way kind of thing. 

And some photographers will go two models and now there's, the ratio doubles sometimes, but for, yeah, for for homestead, we, we try and do, I try and get like at least 20 models. I aim for 30 and usually about 20 end up making it so aim high. And then it ends up being like 20 to 25 models and then photographer wise. 

And usually it's about like 25 to 35 photographers. So yeah, I like to keep the ratio like a good, two to one, three to one, photographer model ratio. So yeah, I feel like there's, the more photographers the better. So yeah, so if that makes sense. 

[00:15:26] Matthew Holliday: no, it does. Personally speaking, I don't know that I could shoot for at least produce a good output. She didn't like 12 hours a day. I know some of the models probably have struggled keep looking good, 12 hours a day to.  

[00:15:35] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Yeah. Sometimes we had makeup artists come and they'll do touch-ups throughout the day. It's, I will say it is exhausting for the models and 11 of them, the newer ones, I will say the stamina, they don't anticipate the type of stamina they need because it's literally hour after hour. 

We do a 10 minute break, so it was like 50 minute increments. And then they get that 10 minutes break. Some models are like booked me all the time. And some are like, I don't want to work from this time to this time. Give me a break here and there. And we, when you breakfast, lunch and dinner breaks and stuff too. 

And but yeah, it's a lot of work to be a model. Photographer wise, too, you had to carry around all the gear and everything, but model wise, it's just post after pose. A lot of them are.  

[00:16:15] Matthew Holliday: Photographer doesn't care what they look  

[00:16:16] Lee Richardson: Yeah, but by day three, the models are just like, I'm sore. My back hurts. Oh, my legs are so tight. 

[00:16:24] Matthew Holliday: Yeah.  

[00:16:25] Lee Richardson: It's a lot of stamina. They have to keep up, especially for a four day event. Like I do. We used to do three days and now we do four days and photographers are asking for five days. I'm like, I don't think we could do five days in there. It's just not enough stamina for everybody. 

[00:16:40] Matthew Holliday: So how much should a photographer budget if they want him to come to one of these.  

[00:16:43] Lee Richardson: It could be as, as, as reasonable as so the way I started doing it, and like I said, I learned over the years, we used to do a whole package and then it was like, like $900. I covered lodging and, insurance for the the event for the four days. And then we started working down little smaller package. 

Like a day pass, a weekend pass, 40 bucks, 50 bucks, and we started doing group shoots there, which were like, 20, $30 a person. So that way they can jump in and kinda, feel out the models, see how they react and how their personality is, how they're imposing is. And then they can book them after, for more hours after that. 

So yeah, it goes from anywhere from, way up there to, way, way down low, if they wanted to, very reasonable prices and stuff, some people want to come in for just one day, shoot all the models and then leave. And some people want to stay the whole weekend food, VIP, all those, golf cart and everything like that. 

Yeah, it's pretty, pretty, a lot of varieties for the, my event, at least, I don't know how other people do it. 

[00:17:45] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. I definitely there's. There's one group in this area. I live in DC. I live near DC and there's a meetup group that does, and they just, they seem to do just shoot out stuff where it's six photographers and one model. I haven't been to one of the events yet. To go cause I'd love to,  

[00:18:00] Lee Richardson: Yeah, you should do it. You should do a podcast  

[00:18:01] Matthew Holliday: someone about it. 

Yeah, exactly.  

[00:18:05] Lee Richardson: next may. 

[00:18:07] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. 

no, I'm actually looking at the, I realized that you guys, you have prices all the way at the bottom. I could have just scroll down the page to the bottom. How do you choose the models that come? I'm sure you have more than 30 models that want to come to something like this.  

[00:18:20] Lee Richardson: Yes. So it's different every year. So like we've had many the models come back to time and time again, they're like, Hey, can I come back? Can I come back? And we're like, yeah, come on back. Bring in photographers, whoever, because a lot of photographers hear about it and the models talk about it. 

And then sometimes it's like friend of a friend Hey, my friend just started modeling, can she come to? And we're like, yeah, sure. Bring her over here with you, you'll fly together, teach her how it all works and explain it all. How, my event, works and then some people would just randomly hit me up because they've seen a flyer or an ad or a photographer, talked about it, or a photographer who went to my event, shot another model. 

And he's Hey, you should go to this event up in Virginia or cruise or wherever, so it was a lot of word of mouth and a lot of, just online and just, friends of friends. That's how I first started. A model would talk to another model and, they'd come up to DC and I'd do a workshop. 

And then that model would tell another model. The next time that person came up, they would talk to me and, it was like a lot of word of mouth moms models and photographers talking to each other as they travel around,  

[00:19:20] Matthew Holliday: from a model's perspective. So you talked a little bit about how much it costs for the photographer to get in. What are the models paid? Are they paid on an hourly basis? Did they get a flat fee? How does that work  

[00:19:29] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Yeah.  

[00:19:29] Matthew Holliday: Was that you don't have to go into details.  

[00:19:31] Lee Richardson: Yeah. It's like an hourly rate, events I went to before, this was another little learning curve that I learned, one model would charge this and one model would charge more and one would charge less because they wanted more bookings. And, for my event, the best plan that I've I've seen is just like flat across the board. 

Everyone gets the same hourly rate for this style. Everyone gets the same for an erotic type of a style of shooting and it's worked out great. Everyone is, likes the rate. It's not a high rate. It's a little bit below a normal rate by a little bit, but because of the mass amount of photographers, their gross volume of money that they make is, more than they would just traveling around and, shooting and driving and Ubering and here and there, they're all there for days. 

Bam. And man, after hour, it's Mo I think one of the models probably made like four grand one time, one year, and she was booked like, 28 hours total, I think the whole four days she was booked for she's in Playboy now, which is cool, but yeah, so we try and keep it across the board. 

We usually do 80 an hour for nude and a hundred an hour for, erotic, open leg style stuff. And everyone's pretty, pretty comfortable with that because there's so many photographers, they make up a quite, quite a bit of money when you calculate it all. And in the end. 

[00:20:52] Matthew Holliday: Sounds like the hustle sounds like she was hustling like crazy for that.  

[00:20:56] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Pictures do help, the website, I try to get the best pictures of the models have, and some pictures aren't the best. Some pictures are amazing. And some people, when they are photograph, they have amazing pictures of oh my God, this landscape or this or that picture of that style or that pose, it really captures some photographers. 

And they're just drawn to I got to shoot this person, four or five hours, something like that, at least. So pictures do help. The portfolio helps a lot. Sophia, ma make sure if you're a model, make sure your portfolio is on check, in great. 

[00:21:27] Matthew Holliday: The model is always there for all four days. I saw you at a day pass for photographers, a D model shop for just one day as well, when they're maybe if they're traveling and swinging through.  

[00:21:36] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Sometimes we've had that happen. Some models that come in they're local, they got to work Thursday and Friday at their normal day job and I can only make it on Saturday and Sunday. And, we, we accommodate that, come on in, know your hours. Boom boom. 

And then I make that available for the booking for the photographers. Yep. That's definitely doable. 

[00:21:55] Matthew Holliday: No, that makes sense. Yeah. It's it's depressing. How many people doing photography and modeling still have to work day jobs? Myself included.  

[00:22:02] Lee Richardson: I know. Let me do. 

[00:22:03] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. Yeah.  

[00:22:05] Lee Richardson: Only we were at Playboy photographers and you could make tons of money. 

[00:22:10] Matthew Holliday: don't know. I was I interviewed. Just two days ago or yesterday I interviewed Sarah St. James and she's convinced that nobody's really making that much money. We know that there are some people I don't know if you've heard of ally girl who is making like a hundred thousand dollars a month on Only vans or something ridiculous.  

[00:22:25] Lee Richardson: fans is  

[00:22:26] Matthew Holliday: was talking about yeah, but still, there's still a lot of people. I interviewed a buck Remington a couple of months ago and he's super, super good, he said, he's making enough to fund like one photography trip a year. So he's not making a  

[00:22:37] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Yeah. It's a hard  

business.  

[00:22:39] Matthew Holliday: depressing.  

[00:22:40] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Ever  

[00:22:41] Matthew Holliday: I see. 

Super talented people  

[00:22:42] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Ever since the online platforms came and my, models can do what they want and do it however they want on their own platforms. It's taken away from the the adult industry side and the new modeling side and everything. 

[00:22:56] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. but you know what? Speaking of that, so in that interview with Samantha James, she mentioned that Florida's now the adult sort of work capital of the U S now it's all moved out of California.  

[00:23:07] Lee Richardson: it kinda has, yeah. California made these stupid rules where it came from, like the Uber drivers and Lyft drivers, I think some stupid law where you have to have an LLC to be paid in any way. So everyone just jumped ship and went to Florida because they don't have that law. Yeah. 

Cause models couldn't be paid unless they had an LLC, so they don't know how to make an LLC most of the time or they needed somebody, a CPA or something like that, so we have, Florida's just we don't care as usual come to Florida.  

[00:23:39] Matthew Holliday: that's a good thing. Sometimes. It's not.  

[00:23:41] Lee Richardson: COVID come on down to Florida. 

[00:23:46] Matthew Holliday: All right. So let's move on and talk about the model of the agency then, unless you have, are there, is there a question I should've asked about the event that I didn't  

[00:23:52] Lee Richardson: No. Yeah. It's going to be a great event. We're going to, this will be our seventh year in a row. It's been great every year since, great time, great scenery, great models, everyone. I try and handpick the models. I don't like the drama models. I don't, I want models that are here to work and they want good pictures and they want to do, their personality is, above and beyond. 

And, I try and handpick every model every year, I've tried to pick the best models. And yeah, it's always been a great time. Some events, they just let any model in and I'm like, oh boy, okay, that's drama. But yeah, it's a good event, but yeah. The modeling agency. Yeah, we just started that a year ago. 

[00:24:30] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. you mentioned you're working with a partner who as a model. 

[00:24:35] Lee Richardson: Yeah. So my partner and I, Nikki, her name is Nikki. She goes by Nicky doll face on Instagram, and she's been a model at the homestead beauties events for the last four years. We met in DC. She was traveling through, and we've been best friends since then. And I originally tried to start a modeling agency up in DC when I was in the military and it just wasn't really, I didn't have the time for it. 

And I made an LLC years ago. When we got down here she lives down here now last year, I was like, you know what? We should like, as we kinda saw the adult industry thriving down here, we were like, we should maybe start at an adult agency, cause it seems like w we were seeing a lot of pitfalls and like the models that, I was shooting for different, sites and magazines and stuff. 

And they just, weren't very educated. They weren't really taught anything about the industry, anything about the business side of being a, a model and not, nude or adult ministry wise. And we put our heads together. And when we, we got licensed and bonded in Florida and, we've been recruiting models, over the last year we finally got licensed but it took about a year to get licensed. 

So because of the. And, we've been educating models, have helping models get into what we feel is the right way to get into your adult industry, which is not just Hey, here you go. Here's a shoot. You're going to go do this and that tomorrow. Whereas you know how to educate them on their savings and their money management and their marketing and how to, just have a, had an etiquette on set and how to, perform and, pose and just stuff like that. 

I do a lot of the portfolio shots for the models and yeah, it's just a little bit different kind of angle or style that we use for our agency versus the other agencies down here. The other ones, they just throw you into the lion's den. Hey, you got to shoot tomorrow at 9:00 AM and blah, blah, blah. 

And here you go, bam, have fun, figure it out, whereas we try and educate them on, Hey, this is what you're going to expect. This is what you need to do. This is what you need to prepare for. Stuff like that. 

[00:26:40] Matthew Holliday: What services. So if a model was looking for an agency or was thinking about getting an agent, what services do you provide for the models? I know you mentioned something about the mentoring and we'll talk more about that. 

later, but what other services.  

[00:26:52] Lee Richardson: Yeah. So it's the biggest thing is safety. So you mean, a lot of models they jump in thinking, modeling, oh, I can just go do whatever, go to whoever's house or go to whoever's studio or this or that, and just, do it on their own. Like we, we've been doing this for, seven, eight years now. 

Just being in this industry, w we know who is, not the right person that you want to go to a random hotel with and shoot with versus, someone who we know is legit and they're established and, just there's a lot of safety would be the first big thing that I would say is good about an agency being represented. 

And then also the side of. Having someone who's there, we usually help them models with brides to, and from shoots down here, cause when you're traveling in, you might, you might not have a car, stuff like that. But also, just knowing who's who what to expect Hey, this two's going to be like this one's going to be like that. 

Also, preparing them, mentoring them, make sure you do this on Instagram the night before, make sure you don't forget to do this or that, just a lot of just preparation stuff and managing type of stuff that, some people might not have time to do. Because they're just modeling every day, so it's a lot of work to be a model and a lot of models, by the time you get on from a shoot, you just want to go home and then watch Netflix or sleep or eat or something. You don't have time to jump on the computer and start digging again for the next, that you want. So it's a lot of help, on the model side, it's a lot of help that we try and provide, and help them out for. 

[00:28:26] Matthew Holliday: And I dunno how much time it takes on the model side, but I know both from the podcast and from doing, my own photography probably takes an hour or so maybe two hours to usually set up a shoot and that's a super amateur shoot, but just the two of us, I don't, I can't, between the back and the forth and all that other and the renting. 

And again, imagine how long it would take to set up something more complicated, probably date days. If you're doing a video shoot with a set.  

[00:28:51] Lee Richardson: exactly. And then, plus sometimes wardrobe make all this stuff that models have to go through, shoot at 11 o'clock could start 6:00 AM for them just to get ready, dreads, packed, blah, blah, blah. It's just so much stuff that they have to go through. And sometimes it helps to have someone helping you out, driving you there and getting you ready to getting you back the night before helping you set up. 

[00:29:13] Matthew Holliday: Yeah, I've definitely. 

heard from some models. We've had discussions with how they like keep track of all the photographers they work with. And just a lot of stuff that, again, you guys already know, you guys already know which photographers, the good ones, which are the ones to stay away from all that sort of stuff. 

[00:29:26] Lee Richardson: Yeah, definitely. 

[00:29:28] Matthew Holliday: So what type of models should seek agency representation? We, out of the wide variety of amateur models that are out there.  

[00:29:36] Lee Richardson: I would say, any model could seek agency representation some models, some models have done it for so long and they just, they have it down to a T they know where their scheduled, they know their travel dates or notices when they're, who they're emailing, that it's taken them years to get there. 

But I would say, the models that want help with setting that kind of stuff up, knowing where to travel, when, who, where, cause you might not want to go to a certain city where. Models are traveling at the same timeframe, cause then now you're competing against five people. 

So it's good to know schedules, stuff like that. But I would say, anyone who's just looking for, an extra help, with planning, scheduling, mentoring, stuff that you just might not know that could take you years to learn the hard way, over the years of learning and trial and error kind of stuff. 

[00:30:27] Matthew Holliday: This is, I don't know anything about agencies. I've never actually worked with a model through an agency. So I apologize if I seem a little naive with some of these other cases. But if a model is signed to an agency, it does all of their, where are they required to work through the agency for everything?  

[00:30:41] Lee Richardson: Not really everything. No. It's good if they, for us in particular if they say, Hey, Joe Schmoe on Instagram, hit me up and wants to shoot with me tomorrow for a nude erotic shoot for four hours. And he wants to pay me. It's great that if they share that information with us, cause we could say, whoa, hang on, Joe Schmoe is on our like, not list. 

And we don't think it's a good idea, but that's just us giving you, I'm guidance. If they want to choose somewhere, they want to shoot something on their own with whoever, whatever, it's not really, they don't really need to worry about that with us. We just like, I, we like, as our agency, like to know that we're at least kept in the loop just in case something happens and where are you going to be? 

What time? Just in case we don't hear from, five hours later, we can start looking for you or something, most of the time we'll set up, we'll say, Hey, we have a photographer. He's here's his work, he's been, he's a great photographer. 

You'll love it. It's going to be this much four hours there. Here's the. If you need a ride, we'll take me there. So it's just more of a lot of safety issues is the biggest thing for an agency because a lot of models, I'm sure we've all heard the stories, just they ended up going in the wrong place with the wrong photographer, and then it just goes downhill from there and some, bad way. 

And then that basically completely turns them off from modeling for life or something, all because of one photographer, someone with so much potential just gets really turned off because of one bad incident. And it could have been, it could have been looked out for ahead of time and prevented. 

[00:32:17] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. So you mentioned photographers getting, working with models for, four hours or eight hours or more if there's a long, is it just look, have you seen a trend for how long most photographers usually work with models on is it, does it usually they typically do two hour chunks or four hour chunks. 

I'm just curious personally.  

[00:32:34] Lee Richardson: Yeah. I would say it's half and half honestly. Some model, some photographers like eight one hour and that's, that's all they want because they'll get everything they need in an hour. And then some photographers, they want to change lights around, they wanna move spaces. They don't wanna, give the models a little time to change and break and stuff like that. 

So I've seen anywhere from an hour to eight hours, I would say, I always tell the models two hour minimum. If you're traveling somewhere and go for a two hour minimum, especially if you're traveling, if it's a cheap Uber ride somewhere, but if you're traveling an hour and a half away, Make that a four-hour shoot. 

Cause you know, it's an hour and a half there, hour and a half back. You're literally wasting eight hours, not wasting, but you're taking almost three hours to get there and back and then four hours, shoot, you want to get at least make your money back on the Uber at least. 

[00:33:19] Matthew Holliday: That's actually my that's my rule of thumb. Whenever I'm looking at how far away something is, it's what I enjoy this for longer than the car drive to get there.  

[00:33:26] Lee Richardson: Exactly. Me too. 

[00:33:28] Matthew Holliday: All Right? That's interesting. Cause I've, I typically have shot in two hour chunks, but I've been thinking about what would I do if I had a four hour and eight hour chunk of time? 

Cause again I'm a pretty amateur photographer myself. That's part of why I started. This is cause I was super curious about how more professional people did things. 

[00:33:44] Lee Richardson: Yeah. Cause some people, yeah, some people want to just take the time, change, lighting, change this, just take their time. Some people just are they know exactly what they want, exactly how to get it and they know exactly it's going to take an hour and then bam. So yeah, it depends on the. 

[00:33:57] Matthew Holliday: How would a photographer get vetted by an agency? Is it typically just as people work with them, like just keep some notes on them or is it a specific bedding process if they wanted to come work with you, they would come to you and do something to be vetted or what.  

[00:34:11] Lee Richardson: Yeah. It's a little bit of both. It's our photographers that have worked with us over the years, we know who they are, how they choose their style and stuff like that. And the models also, models, everyone talks, so someone says something about someone, someone else hears that usually. 

So yeah. Sometimes someone, I don't take everything. I take everything with a grain of salt. I'll try and vet the person as best I can, look at their work on model mayhem, Instagram, model mayhem was great because you could see how long the person has been shooting for their style their they have the comments below now where you can see other people that have commented about the photographer. 

So that's a good vetting process. But yeah, most of the time it's just kind of word of mouth or for us, knowing who they are and how they shoot and how to prepare the model for that specific photographer, 

[00:35:03] Matthew Holliday: Out of curiosity. I, again this is coming from a super amateur. I've never worked with an agency before, frankly, whenever I see a model say that she's agency represented, I'm usually super intimidated. When the photographer makes the request to the agency, how detailed do they get? 

Like what kind of detail are you looking for from the photographer, 

[00:35:22] Lee Richardson: it could be as detailed as I want her to wear X, Y, and Z. Be here. And she's going to do X, Y, and Z. And then we just forward that over to the model, let them know, Hey, this is what tomorrow's shoot is. Are you comfortable with that? Is that work okay? Yes or no. Or it could just be like, we want to shoot for eight hours. 

We're not sure really what we want to do is going to be a mix of nude. So the ride, obviously what's the word erotic kind of pops in, and then we asked the question what do you mean by erotic? So that way we know exactly what that means to you versus what it could mean, to a brand new model, and so then, that could be this or that. So yeah. It's not too intimidating, but it's just, it's just kinda like asking questions and getting answers, for them. So that way they can prepare mentally and both physically, stuff like that. Yeah. So it's pretty, it's not too intimidating, but it does sound intimidating. 

[00:36:15] Matthew Holliday: Do you guys have any, do you have any interesting requests you've seen that you could share just like any wacky off the wall? Like I need a model to stomp on eggs or something like that.  

[00:36:24] Lee Richardson: Sometimes  

[00:36:25] Matthew Holliday: That was very specific.  

[00:36:26] Lee Richardson: Like a balloon popping, we want her to be in a bikini and pop balloons on the bed all day or something, it's so random or talk to the camera like this for that. And it's just, sometimes it's just what the hell are they thinking? 

Like, all right, whatever. And  

[00:36:44] Matthew Holliday: someone's buying.  

[00:36:45] Lee Richardson: yeah. Or like inner dance naked to eighties music and how yields or something goofy like  

[00:36:50] Matthew Holliday: that. is a very, that is very specific.  

[00:36:52] Lee Richardson: It's and then I tell them like, Hey, this guy wants you to dance naked for eight hours for $800 the eighties music. And are you down for that? And they're like, sure, it's a workout. 

I get paid for it. I get paid to work out like, and heels. 

[00:37:07] Matthew Holliday: I remember reading somewhere that something like 80% of men have a fetish and something like 10% of women have one and for men it's set sometime in their teenage years. So Yeah. 

so like the eighties music on high heels totally makes sense to me actually, like there was something happened to them when they were like 13 years old and they're just trying to redo that.  

[00:37:29] Lee Richardson: I feel like,  

[00:37:30] Matthew Holliday: But anyways,  

[00:37:30] Lee Richardson: I feel like a majority of photographers nowadays in this era wished they could be that Playboy photographer back in like the sixties and seventies. And now they're reliving that through their retirement or their pension or something. So it's being a kid again, having the money to do it 

[00:37:51] Matthew Holliday: Okay. What could that open up? One of those magazines didn't think of that, right? Man, I wish I could have been taking those pictures. All right. You mentioned, so you mentioned a rate there but just in general, do agency models get different rates than independent models? 

Is it more standardized because you're working through an agency? How does that work?  

[00:38:10] Lee Richardson: Not really. It's just based on whatever they're needed for what they're doing. If it's adult related, it jumps up because you're dealing with testing, cause there's a very standardized testing for anything adult where there's, any kind of interaction with another person. 

So that's very strict, very standardized down here. It's, usually a 14 day test that is very strict, it's a blood urine test. And then a COVID test when that came out, you have to do that every three days. Some companies require it for 24 hours. And the girls are constantly having to go back and forth down to Miami. 

Cause there's only one facility. That represent, that basically you uses, the adult industry standards. So yeah many trips back and forth to Miami, many early mornings with the models, waking them up at six, 6:00 AM to get him tested by 7:00 AM. Take them to their shoot, shoot by 9:00 AM and get them ready. 

But, so it's  

[00:39:08] Matthew Holliday: Did that facility work with the groups to make them do the daily tests?  

[00:39:12] Lee Richardson: Yeah. They, yeah, they were overwhelmed when it first started back last year. We were, we were seeing everyone every day Hey, see you again, see you tomorrow. See you the next day. We were just there every other day, Friday because COVID was a scared back last year, but it's gotten a little bit better  

[00:39:28] Matthew Holliday: Yeah.  

[00:39:29] Lee Richardson: but yeah, it's pretty strict for the adult stuff. 

Models and photographers for the news type of stuff. They don't really, they control that environment. If they want someone to be COVID tested or they want to wear a mask or something, we let them do whatever they feel comfortable with. So yeah, it was kinda just depends on what the shoot is. 

And that kind of depends on the rate and stuff like that. Nude modeling Suzy, 80 to a hundred, maybe 120 an hour, when you get up to the adult industry's type of stuff, when it's a male or female or a female, it jumps up to the 700, $800,000 kind of range for like a production company that, you would see on, a website or something. 

So yeah, it just varies depending on the project. 

[00:40:13] Matthew Holliday: Yeah, I'm probably going to cut the specific numbers out. I've shied away from putting specific rates on the bike asked. I don't know. I don't know if that's a conscious decision on my part. I know I've been quoted rates for a B for new modeling from 50 to $350 an hour for the really high-end traveling models. 

I find that I just find that so interesting. Like what a wide  

[00:40:35] Lee Richardson: Yeah, it gets to get very wide. I would say it's good and bad. As a photographer, it's that's good. But I would say, as a model it's great, but I got shot a model who we got the cover of hustler magazine last month and she could charge 200 an hour and she's getting it because she's the government hustler magazine. 

I credibility, made her rate blow up a little bit, some models doing some models zone. 

[00:41:04] Matthew Holliday: That's interesting. That's really interesting. Cause I think, yeah, generally speaking, most of the models in this area, try to charge a hundred to one 50 for nude work.  

[00:41:13] Lee Richardson: Yeah, that sounds about right. Yeah, 

[00:41:16] Matthew Holliday: Actually let's talk a little bit about the different saying photography and video from an agency perspective you guys represent both. It looks like.  

[00:41:22] Lee Richardson: yeah. Yeah. A lot of people now producers, companies, websites, it's so old fashioned, but they still want photos to match the video. So yeah, it's like a, both for, at least for the adult industry side, I've seen a lot of great video work or even like video work, taken an, a still taken from the video as a photo. 

So yeah, it's certainly become more popular. I got the iPhone 13 and the video is just ridiculously incredible, I've seen a lot of, I've seen photographers at homestead. They'll bring a drone, they'll shoot some video over above, and this. So I think video is starting to come along and be more comfortable now in the modeling industry. 

Cause it's just like something you can capture, whether it's slow motion, whether it's cinematic, whether it's that the field, just like lots of different stuff, you can get really more creative when video comes in versus just still photography. Yeah. You can capture a great image, in a still, but sometimes the video is just it can be more creative and a more creative outlet sometimes, and I've done the same and I've gotten some great videos. 

I'm like, wow that picture wouldn't have been as good as this video was,  

[00:42:36] Matthew Holliday: I'm just showing my age. I'm probably not quite as, I don't know? 

I'm a little bit on the older side. I'm not too old, but I can definitely remember when gifts on the internet started and like a little six second repeat. And I was just amazed at some of the things  

[00:42:51] Lee Richardson: And then with like iPhones, like it's underwater. You literally can take your camera underwater here there. You can do so much with like just an iPhone in general, but not having to buy a whole rig and a whole under Bobby Cherry, enclosure, it's just like more affordable to now. 

Just like without your iPhone and just use that versus your big ass camera and lights and this and that, and you can edit right then and there or drop it right to the model right then and there, I've gotten, way more, better results lately than my regular Sony camera. 

[00:43:22] Matthew Holliday: That's interesting. I actually, I tried to do a video for the first time. I was a shooting with Anastasia may the other day. And I tried to do a video of the podcast and I was trying to use my actual camera, and I was having a ton of trouble versus just, using using my phone and just hitting the record button. 

It just took care of everything for me.  

[00:43:39] Lee Richardson: Apple's  

[00:43:39] Matthew Holliday: ah, this is supposed to be better.  

[00:43:41] Lee Richardson: Apple's going to put us all out of business. 

[00:43:46] Matthew Holliday: I've seen all those shootouts on YouTube where they're like, can you tell which one is the camera? And which one is the iPhone? And it is darn hard.  

[00:43:54] Lee Richardson: That's crazy. 

[00:43:55] Matthew Holliday: So what one last question on the modeling agency and let's move on. So do you think that amateur and semi-pro photographers should reach out to agencies or is it generally specifically people trying to produce content and professional groups reaching out to agencies?  

[00:44:09] Lee Richardson: I would say both. We've had a good bit of success with just people who are, they see the only fans taking off. They see that being a moneymaker. They see, all the other sites taking off and being lucrative for the models. And so photographers or amateur semi-pro. They'll reach out to us. 

We vet them very carefully. Obviously we make sure exactly what they're wanting, what they're doing, what they want to shoot. And, it's a lucrative business, as a photographer. So you got, put your stuff out there on patriarchy on are only fans. And, some people make more money than the models by paying, they might book a model for an hour for a hundred dollars and they might get, five sets of photos to videos. 

And that might make them 500 to a thousand dollars on Patrion or only fans or something like, that's out there on the platform level. And yeah, it's starting to become more of a popular thing now. Because of this kind of digital, there's even a cryptocurrency coming out. I don't know if you've heard about that yet, but basically it's it's where you can sell your content. 

And only in Ft. Yeah. Only people can have it. It's like having the Mona Lisa or a fake Mona Lisa, but basically it's like a crypto way and I'm buying a little bit of stock in it. Ma it might jump up. It might not. But I think once the adult industry jumps into it, it could blow up and be the next, adult cryptocurrency in this era because it doesn't surprise me because crypto is blowing up like crazy anyway. 

[00:45:40] Matthew Holliday: Yeah, no, it actually, yeah, that seems like a really good way to support specific creators by, owning the official version of your favorite photo of your favorite creator. That does seem 

[00:45:50] Lee Richardson: only version. Yep.  

[00:45:52] Matthew Holliday: that was The only official version. And then maybe they don't release it either, but I guess they'd have to release it. 

See, It's a for you to know what you're buying yeah. I dunno. I  

[00:46:00] Lee Richardson: interesting. I'm curious where to see the next five years of the adult industry goes. 

[00:46:05] Matthew Holliday: You mentioned you were kicking off a new project when we talked to making models, pro.com. What is that? And what started at.  

[00:46:12] Lee Richardson: So making models, pro.com is a mentoring program that we started myself and my partner, Nicole her being a model for many years, me being a photographer and mentor and everything else, it's something where anybody of any age or anyone's mom who wants them to be the next model or something, it can be any age. 

It can be. And it's nothing to do with nude or adult related, anything. It's just how to get jump started into modeling. So walking you through the steps because everyone kind of jumps around. When they jumped into modeling, they jumped around here, they jumped around there. This email doesn't match that they get shut down on Instagram here or there, that model mayhem doesn't approve it because of that, because the picture's wrong size, something, all the variables that you have to go through until you finally learn a year later, how to do it all right. 

It was basically us, basically like a weekly or maybe biweekly, zoom call or a phone call, or, reach us on texts, basically walking you through where you want to go in your modeling path and us guiding you on the best of our abilities and knowledge to how to get there. 

So it's like a six month program. We'll take you from day one to okay, here's where you need to start. Here's what you need to do next week. Okay. Did you do this right? Did you do that? Okay. Where are you getting hung up at? Okay. Let's fix this. Let's fix that. Okay. Next week. 

Okay. And then slowly just building them into running their own kind of modeling, industry career, and basically just helping, we're only opening it up to 10 models. Cause we don't want to have it go too crazy. So we wanted to spend as much attention as we can on each person. 

But basically it's going to be a great mentoring program on just how to get from not knowing anything to being career. If you want to travel cool. If you don't, if you want to this, we'll guide you along the way, whatever path you're wanting to go, we're going to guide you to that path. 

[00:48:19] Matthew Holliday: that makes sense. Is this, I assume this is what's your partner. Who's also doing Mt. Models. They seem, this is an outgrowth of their, is this only for this is only for sine models or is this open to anybody that wants to model.  

[00:48:30] Lee Richardson: Yeah, this can be anybody. You don't have to sign with us or anything. You can be completely independent. And if you want to sign with us that, that's even better, you can, we can, have more bookings and availability and stuff like that. We can set you up with people that we know, if you're in the middle of Kansas and you want to be part of the program, we can zoom call you. 

We can find out who we know in Kansas. We can shoot your portfolio shots. We can tell you how to find the right people not get looped into the wrong people. Tell me your travel. Where are you wanting to go? Or, what are your availabilities are? Stuff like that, are you trying to do it? 

Full-time, part-time for fun. Just lots of different, ways to help people become whatever kind of model they want to be. 

[00:49:10] Matthew Holliday: Are there any common pitfalls models run into?  

[00:49:13] Lee Richardson: I would say, I don't want to say the word laziness, but I would say the the amount of time they don't have to, after a shoot to get back on that computer and get back working and get back finding, it's just it's exhausting. So that's the pitfall I would say would be just not having enough time in the day to focus on the next day and the next day and the next day, it's it's compared to maybe car sales or something, you sell a car today. 

If you could try to sell one tomorrow and you didn't have the chance because you just went home after you sold today's car, then now you don't have tomorrow's car waiting for you and someone else. Could it be selling that car for you instead and helping you? And then, now you're selling the car every day or something, it's like just helping everybody to just get more and more work and more and more experience and everything like that. 

[00:50:06] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. Oh, all we're definitely at a time. I swear. I looked at the clock. I thought it was like five minutes ago, but it was like 20 minutes ago. So  

[00:50:13] Lee Richardson: No worries. 

[00:50:14] Matthew Holliday: to finish off where I finished off with the same question I ask every week. What is your favorite photo in your portfolio? 

[00:50:20] Lee Richardson: I would say as back when I first started it was when I was traveling through to DC after Hawaii, it was a picture of this girl with short red hair and her chin, these beautiful, colorful tattoos on this bed with these cute little white socks. And it just, it was a lucky shot and she just had the greatest expression. 

I would think that one would be my first or maybe second. My favorite one, which I think is not safe for work would be from our cruise. We did years ago. It was the biggest cruise ever that we did. It was like 15 models and 25 photographers. It was like herding cats and cows around their hand to get them to meet here, meet there with no wifi, no signal. 

It was like everyone, we had to meet at dinner every night to tell everybody where to go, where to meet, not be late because the boat will leave with, or without you, but it was all 15 of them across the ocean, right on the S on the sand, right by the water, all hands around each other, completely nude. 

And it was just like the most amazing models probably ever worked. Many of them are super huge, super famous Playboy, all these crazy publications now. But that was years ago. That would be my one or two favorites. And then probably the second one was like my first shoot ever. 

It was like a picture of a girl in the bikini on a, in a playground. She ended up shooting bikini on a playground. I was like, are we going to get arrested for this? But ended up being an amazing photo. And that was when I had just rented triggers and flash a little on speed flash and just got super lucky, just you watch YouTube videos, but those are probably my, some of my favorite photos. 

Those three. 

[00:52:00] Matthew Holliday: As I haven't seen the, I haven't seen the, one of the, all the models for the other one, but the other ones are phenomenal. Yeah. I didn't even notice it was a playground. Although you can see now in the bottom  

[00:52:09] Lee Richardson: Yeah,  

[00:52:09] Matthew Holliday: playground equipment.  

[00:52:11] Lee Richardson: She wanted me to bring, she wanted me to bring them balloons and I was like I'm not bringing balloons, wearing a camera around my neck to a playground. I'm going to get arrested right away. So she brought the balloons instead. 

[00:52:25] Matthew Holliday: All right. Lee, where can everyone find you online? If they wanted to follow your follow you or check out these programs? We've talked about.  

[00:52:32] Lee Richardson: Yes. The main site is shutter fund.com like shutter from a camera and the words fun. Like you're having fun. So shutterfly.com. That's where we do all our events at. And I have to say it otherwise. We were like, wait, what? That, and then, like I said for the agency melt models, like they're melting in front of you. 

Cause there's so hot, beautiful melt models.com. And then our mentoring program is making models. pro.com. So that's our other program and yeah, all those websites. And then Instagram is Lee Richardson photo, and then Instagram is the melt models. And then making models pro on Instagram too. 

So yeah, although it was pretty simple trying to make it pretty basic, so yeah. Check them out when you can. And I'd love to see you at the next event, 

[00:53:22] Matthew Holliday: now, I'm definitely planning on it next year. 100%. have any other ongoing projects you'd like to mention we hit those three big ones.  

[00:53:30] Lee Richardson: homestead, beauties next may probably going to be the weekend before Memorial day. So it'd be Memorial day weekend unless everyone's plans don't work out for that weekend, but usually some people have the Monday off, so they can relax after the whole shooting weekend happens and then we're aiming for a cruise and probably January, maybe December, depending on what everybody's schedules kind of work out. 

Ask all the photographers. What schedule do you have? Let me know, blah, blah, blah, and can try and find out. And yeah, so it should be a good time. And then maybe a Jamaica next fall maybe in the August timeframe. I think we're trying to do another Jamaica trip and yeah, it should be a good fun year. 

Next year. Everything opens back up again. 

[00:54:14] Matthew Holliday: Awesome. Awesome. Yeah. like I said, I'm definitely planning to make it to homestead beauties next year. 

[00:54:19] Lee Richardson: Awesome. Yeah. You alive podcast interview all the models there.  

[00:54:23] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. I might even do some photography too. Who  

[00:54:24] Lee Richardson: Hey, there you go. 

[00:54:27] Matthew Holliday: And with that, we are done. Check us out@thensfwphotographypodcast.com on Twitter. As at NSFW photography, Instagram at the NSFW photography podcast, subscribe to your favorite podcast app. Before I let you go. I have a quote from Annie Leibovitz that completely describes how I feel about portrait model photography. 

The thing that you see in my pictures is that I was not afraid to fall in love with these people. I have, everybody has a great week.

Lee Richardson

Photographer

Lee Richardson is a military veteran who has been published in Hustler and Penthouse, owner and creator of Shutterfun, and hasn't found anyone who is putting on larger nude photography events in the world! Lee is a co-owner of Melt Models in Florida, and has a new modeling training program they're getting off the ground.