Aug. 1, 2022

NSFW Pod 036 - Living in Vegas with Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings

NSFW Pod 036 - Living in Vegas with Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings

In this episode we interviewed Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings about making content and living in Las Vegas, Sin City baby!  We talk about how to make the most of your testing, how to find good people to make content with, how to choose where to live and make your content and more!


In this episode we interviewed Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings about making content and living in Las Vegas, Sin City baby!  We talk about how to make the most of your testing, how to find good people to make content with, how to choose where to live and make your content and more!  

If you like what you heard, there's 31 more minutes of the discussion on the Patreon!

Sydney is a plus size pornstar and photographer with over 14 years in the adult industry under her belt. Sydney is an award nominated talent, best known for her fetish content, ranging from vore to futanari to sensual domination. As a photographer, Sydney's work has been displayed in art shows in the US & Australia, having won several "Best in Show" awards

Sydney can be found online at:
Twitter - Sydney_Screams
Hubzter - SydneyScreams4u

Cassie is a transgender pornstar and clip producer, new to the industry but already making waves. She has been nominated for Best New Face and Best Trans Clip Producer in just her first year. Cassie primarily focuses on hardcore content but also films fetish scenes when the mood strikes

Cassie can be found online at:
Twitter - CassCummingsxxx
Website - cassiecummingsxxx.com

Help us reach new listeners by rating us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or your favorite place you get podcasts!  Visit us at https://www.thensfwphotographypodcast.com/

Transcript

Transcript is generated via AI by Descript.  It will contain errors.  If you need an authoritative source for a quote, please consult the audio using the timestamps.  Additionally, Sydney and Cassie joined via Zoom on a single computer, so their replies were unable to be separated by the AI.  

[00:00:00] Matthew Holliday: Good day, everyone. And welcome back to the not safe for work photography podcast. There are thousands of models and photographers, creating adult content, using modern platforms and taking control of their own creative lives. Today. We're interviewing Sydney screams and Cassie Cummings. Sydney is a plus size porn czar and a photographer with over 14 years in the adult industry under her belt. 

Sydney is an award nominated talent, best known for her fetish content ranging from Bo to Tari to central domination. As a photographer, Sydney's work has been displayed in art shows in the us and Australia. Having won several best in show awards. Cassie is a transgender porn star and clip producer, new to the industry, but already making waves. 

She has been nominated for best new face and best trans clip producer. And just her first year, Cassie primarily focuses on hardcore content, but also films, fetish scenes. When the mood strikes, how are you two doing today? 

[00:01:38] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Doing pretty good. Thank you. Full of coffee and ready to go. 

[00:01:43] Matthew Holliday: hopefully you're not swimming in there. 

[00:01:47] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: it's too dry here in Vegas for that. Yeah. 

[00:01:50] Matthew Holliday: You are not kidding. I don't think I've drank so much. And by last couple days, and I'm not even talking about liquor. Uh, I have been in Vegas now for two days and I have not drank or partied at all since I got here on Saturday because I am a super boring human. But anyways, our topic today is producing adult video work and since city itself, Las Vegas. 

So I always like to start with how you got into your photography and adult work. Uh, what's your superhero origin story. 

[00:02:29] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: So I started doing photography when I was in high school, but my grandpa handed me a camera when I was like single digit age range. And I've basically just always had cameras around me. Um, when I hit high school, I started taking photography classes and learned how to develop my own film and work in the dark room and everything. 

And then digital came around very shortly thereafter and I could take more pictures and I didn't have to count on film. And then, uh, I used to put together photography events in Orlando and someone was like, Hey Sydney, wouldn't it be cool if you were in front of the camera? And I was like, oh, that's daunting. 

Let's do it. Um, and so then I started and then I, uh, booked my very first foot fetish shoot soon thereafter. And I found myself in honestly, quite a sketchy situation. I was in a hotel on I drive, which is kind of sketchy area anyway. And I was using some guy's stomach as a trampoline. And now here I am, 

[00:03:33] Matthew Holliday: Interesting. 

[00:03:35] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: there's a lot to unpack there, you know, 

[00:03:40] Matthew Holliday: yeah. I'm, I'm trying to figure out where I want to go from there. 

[00:03:48] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: oh my God. 

[00:03:49] Matthew Holliday: How quick was the, the, the, the first modeling to the first foot fetish? 

[00:03:55] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: When I first got on camera, I was doing like pinup girl stuff and I was 18 and I just, I, I really enjoyed being in front of the camera and I had always enjoyed taking pictures of people, particularly women. All of my photography colleagues were male. I was one of the only female photographers in Orlando at the time who was showing skill and getting lots of shoots and all of that. 

And someone was like, Hey, let, let's get you on camera. And then I wanna say it was just a matter of months before I was doing foot Fetter stuff. 

[00:04:30] Matthew Holliday: Interesting that that was the first one. Although I can see how foot Fe and Bondish are kind of the first and easiest ones, cuz they don't really you're like, oh well that I'm not wearing anything on there anyways, so 

[00:04:42] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: what was funny at the time to me, uh, that you say that is, there were more like art models who would do bondage work than there were art models who would do foot fetish work because they could, I guess, makeup in their mind that the bondage is still artistic. Whereas the foot fetish is fetish and that's a line we don't cross. 

[00:05:07] Matthew Holliday: No, I definitely definitely have been seen with a lot of art models. There's like the, the artsy fetish stuff. And there's, there's like the fun fetish stuff like Zeva does, seems to do a lot of like the fun and goofy fetish stuff 

[00:05:20] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah, Zeva really bridges the line between both the kind of fun fetishy stuff and the artistic stuff. Cuz she does so much of the artistic modeling as well. 

[00:05:29] Matthew Holliday: yeah. And then there's the more explicit fetish stuff that, yeah. But anyways, uh, Cassie 

[00:05:37] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: yes. So, um, mine's very different. My ex-wife was a fetish performer and I supported her from behind the scenes for four or five years at, at the time I wasn't in a position to perform as well. So I, I was never in front of the camera. But I got some behind the camera work. Um, I saw how the industry functioned. 

I saw how connections were made, how clips were produced, that kind of, you know, the, the unfun stuff. Um, I ended up separating from her and I moved out west and, uh, connected with Sydney. Um, and so my first scene, my very first scene was a hardcore, um, Sydney had just gotten a Dick from, what was it? Mr. Hank, Mr. 

Hank's toys. Yeah, that's right. And so, and so Sydney needed to make a usage and review video. And so I performed the bottom role for that video and it, it was really good. It was, uh, 20, 30 minutes long and, um, folks really liked it. And yeah, having that experience of being in front of the, in front of the camera for the first time, I. 

Instantly knew that this is something that I could conceivably do and Excel at. I, I knew a lot of the back end already, you know, a lot of performers don't start with that kind of knowledge and have to figure it out as they go, which is super daunting. Cuz there's so much things that you have to balance in the beginning, especially. 

But, um, but yeah, once I had had that first hardcore scene under my belt, I came up with my name, started building some social media presence and um, and went from there, booked a studio scene shortly thereafter. 

[00:07:32] Matthew Holliday: Huh interest. 

[00:07:34] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: So the, yeah, the, the timeframe for me is gonna be like seven several years, like seven years from first, first experience with my ex-wife to entering with, with Sydney. 

[00:07:46] Matthew Holliday: So, what did you two choose to live in Vegas? 

[00:07:49] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: So I moved out here in 2016 because my, at the time partner was, uh, given the opportunity to relocate. If he so chose, he decided to say yes and take the position out in Vegas. And, uh, I was so desperate to get away from Orlando that I was like, I don't care where I go, just send me somewhere. And so I came out to Vegas with him. 

I didn't move out here for Sydney work at all. I moved out here for him and, uh, it ended up, I think in the long run really benefiting me, but I didn't come out here specifically for work. I, uh, I moved out west when I divorced, you know, I, I accepted a position in LA and I moved out here. Um, Knowing, no one reconnected with Sydney. 

And, um, once, once I had known I was going to be entering the adult industry, I, I knew Vegas was where I needed to be. And, um, and, and moved in with Sydney. Yeah. And now we're dating. Yeah. Well, we were dating before you. Oh yeah. We were dating before I moved in. Yeah. Yeah. We were also dating before you even considered adult work. 

Were we? Yeah. Were we dating? Yeah. Oh, okay. You didn't bring up doing adult work, uh, to me until about, oh yeah. That would've been like two months later, August, maybe of 28, 20 19. That's when we started dating. Okay. So it was shortly thereafter then. There you go. Yeah, there you go. But we were already dating before she brought up wanting to do adult work. 

And I, I honestly tried to turn her off from it because I just that's true. Yeah. I do that with pretty much anyone who has never done any adult work because people tend to not understand a lot of the risks that are involved and they just see what they see on TikTok, for instance, and think it's gonna be really easy money. 

I'm not a really annoying person. That's like, let me tell you how it really is. that's right. 

[00:09:55] Matthew Holliday: so that leads to at least two follow up questions. The first one is, is it easier dating somebody in the industry or dating somebody outside the industry? 

[00:10:07] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Okay. So I, I, I was the partner in the earlier relationship, so I don't know that I can speak to that portion, but Sydney. So Cassie is the first person I've ever dated who. Who considers herself to be a part of the industry. My ex that I moved out here with, I guess he, uh, in some weird twisted way considered himself part of the industry, but he was just industry adjacent because of his connection to me. 

And then the connections that I helped him forge with other performers, but he was never like the only time he was ever on camera was actually kind of hilariously for Cassie's ex-wife for a custom video and then he, and I did a couple videos together, but that was the only time he ever performed. I think that dating someone in the industry has some challenges just because of my own personal life experience. 

But in many ways, I love that Cassie is in the industry. I am very passionate about my work and I like that Cassie and I can just shoot the shit about our jobs together. We can laugh about strange things we saw on the internet today, or like, Hey, I saw this new camera. Doesn't this look interesting, or check out this lighting that this person uses. 

How can we recreate that? And I, I really value that. I have a partner who is on the same page as me when it comes to the professional side of work. The emotional side of work sometimes gets a little, a little cloudy, but overall, I think that Cassie is a really great partner to be in this industry with, because she has an unquenchable desire to learn and grow and better. 

And I got my, my first major nomination this past year. And I don't think I would've done that without someone inspiring me and pushing me to get there. I say these things to other people, but Cassie's never around to hear them, but , she's giving me like sad lovey eyes right now. 

[00:12:15] Matthew Holliday: that's awesome. Something about dissuading people from coming into the adult industry. 

[00:12:19] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: mm-hmm yeah. Oh, I guess I'm a gatekeeper shit. Yeah. Gate keep and girl boss. Oh gosh. Um, so there's a lot of things about this industry that don't get shown in mainstream media. They, they get glamorized, um, romanticized. And when it comes to actually making money in this industry, especially the more adult side of things, rather than being like a traveling nude art model, um, when it comes to actually making money in the adult industry, It's not just booking studio gigs and calling it a day. 

Mm-hmm Cassie. sorry to throw you under the bus for a little bit, baby. No, go for it. Cassie entered into the industry, thinking that she'd be booking one pro shoot a month enough to pay her bills. And then she could just kinda chill a little bit and do herself produce stuff much more casually, but the industry isn't so flooded with performers that that's not really the case anymore. 

And so there's a lot of work that you have to do as a self produced porn start that people don't see. And like on TikTok TikTok, I constantly see people like, oh, it's so easy to make $8,000 a month selling foot pictures. But like, it's not that easy. It's not, it's fucking hard. And people don't really think of the realistic aspects of what it takes to find success in this industry. 

They just see the glamor, the parties, the production studios, all of that. And they don't really have a grasp of what it actually takes to make a living doing this full time. 

[00:14:13] Matthew Holliday: yeah, I'm gonna edit out the numbers that I'm gonna say, because I, frankly, I try not to release people's rates or anything like that on the podcast, because I figure that's, you know, a conversation between people between producers and photographers. 

[00:14:27] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: definitely. 

[00:14:28] Matthew Holliday: But I know that for example, most explicit models, the standard. 

The standard rate, obviously individual models go higher and lower, whatever the standard rate, uh, for explicit solo content tends to be around dollars an hour for erotic content. Now, if you try and sell videos of that for 10 bucks, a pop, um, and you pay a model, you know, for four hours to film various pieces of content, you've gotta sell what, like videos to make your money back as the photographer. 

And then if you're talking about boy, girl content, you're talking about way more than that. Cuz that's for hiring both models and hiring a location. And if you wanna bring in crew, it's even more than that, like it's way, way, 

[00:15:18] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah, yeah, yeah. So I will say though, it is a lot easier to recoup your income in this industry than I think people expect. So I do some hiring of fetish models if someone's coming to town and I know they've got good acting skills and can do the type of con the types of fetish content that I do, I hire. 

And for two hours, I generally expect to get four videos per hour. So a total of eight. 

[00:15:47] Matthew Holliday: interesting. 

[00:15:48] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: So let's say I am paying them dollars an hour for non nude fetish content. 

[00:15:55] Matthew Holliday: Mm-hmm 

[00:15:56] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: That's investment. I've had clips that sold so well, just a single clip that has sold, let's say 20, 50, a hundred times that that one video makes me back my income. 

And when it comes to time, investment versus dollar investment, hiring a model to create eight videos for me in two hours is a much shorter time investment than me doing, like say content trade with a model where I'm probably there for six to eight hours. And maybe I come home with four or five exclusive videos, maybe. 

[00:16:40] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. I'm gonna chop, I'm gonna chop this whole conversation to hell in post 

[00:16:45] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah. Yeah. And that, and that's, and that's the difference between a trade and paid opportunity because paid you're there to work. Yeah. You're not there to socialize, 

[00:16:53] Matthew Holliday: You're getting a guaranteed income 

[00:16:55] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah, yeah, yeah. Trade is more of a relaxed, let's go at our pace kind of thing. Yeah. 

[00:17:01] Matthew Holliday: Cause I think so my conversation with Gerald, he was talking about, he typically brings in a model for four hours. He usually gets, I think he said six to eight pieces of content in that four hours. So it sounds like he's being a lot more relaxed than you 

[00:17:14] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: yeah, it sounds like 

[00:17:15] Matthew Holliday: longer pieces of content. 

[00:17:17] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: it can also be a difference of types of content. Like if you're shooting wrestling, for example. Mm. Yeah. That's extremely physically intense. I've been hired to do wrestling, uh, work where one hour is one video. 

[00:17:34] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. 

[00:17:35] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: like the videos I shoot. Me and the other model are sitting on the bed, talking to the camera about how we're going to feed them fatter, or I'm lifting them up because they're light enough for me to do a lifting carry video. 

And so it's not even just like hour for hours, same, same. It's also what type of content and mm-hmm , I, I'm not gonna lie. I kind of burn and churn when it, or churn and burn when it comes to content, because I'm just part of that kind of generation where it's quantity over quality. And as I slowly move towards the quality over quantity, it does make it, so I get less per hour, but in theory, sales are better and whatnot. 

And so it just, it varies a lot depending on what the type of content is, who the performers are, who the producers are. So it's not as cut and dry as just, you get this amount of content and this amount of time. 

[00:18:36] Matthew Holliday: no. And that, that actually answers one of my questions later about how do you figure out which fetishes to target, but it sounds like you're taking kind of the shotgun approach. Like let's hit all the fetishes and see which ones sell. 

[00:18:48] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Well, some, some, some of the fetishes don't cause that's what I did. When I, when I entered the industry, I quickly realized that I was not booking one studio per month to pay my bill. So I, I needed to start producing my own content earlier than I expected. And that's exactly what I did. I did a shotgun approach to fetish and I just did one of every fetish I could think of just to get it out there. 

See, see what fans wanted from me. And letting them dictate what I make in a broad way, because if they don't wanna see me do wrestling content, then I won't do it. I won't waste my time, but I'm letting them. Pay or vote with their dollars in a sense. And it's funny to see what works for me, what they wanna see from me versus what they wanna see from my peers, because I may look a lot like another model, another trans model, but they're getting paid to do stuff that my fans don't wanna see me do. 

Mm-hmm and, and vice versa, even, you know, and even like when Cassie started, I was like, here are all these fetishes you can do. I'll show you how and like things that would work for me don't work for her. Mm-hmm . But I don't really do the, the kind of throw spaghetti at the wall technique because I, I mean, I've, I'm much more established than Cassie in terms of my fan base, but I've got four core fetish categories that I post new content in pretty much on a weekly basis. 

And then. Beyond that. Yeah. I have some stuff that I'm like, okay, I've never tried this before. Let's fucking see if it works. But for the most part, I know what my fans wanna see from me. And I stick to it. 

[00:20:38] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. 

[00:20:39] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: I have an idea. Yeah. I, I, I haven't nailed down the top four categories yet, but you know, I'm working on it. 

Yeah. When I look at my analytics year over year, over year, those for me, the four categories that are my core four, they're the same. They've been the same for years now, even before I determined that those were my core four, they were, I just didn't know it at the time. 

[00:21:04] Matthew Holliday: That's interesting. You mentioned analytics. Do you keep track of your videos over time and like what sells the most and like which categories sell the most, et cetera. 

[00:21:12] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Oh, yes. Yeah. AB absolutely. Yes. Oh yes. That was something that I, I tried really hard to instill in Cassie too. Mm-hmm because if you just are, willy-nilly making content and you don't pay attention to, what's actually working for you, then you're working harder than you need to. And fuck capitalism works smarter, not harder. 

You're also just gonna, you're gonna discourage yourself cuz you're gonna look at your sales and be like, well, no one, no one thinks I'm hot. No one likes my content. No one likes the way that I film things. When in reality, you're just filming a fetish that they don't wanna see you in, but they would be happy to see you do this other one over here. 

Yeah. If you just knew to do it. Analytics will tell you what they want. Yeah. And sometimes you gotta really dig through, but my vanilla career was marketing and advertising. And so paying attention to my sex work analytics was just kind of something that I knew to do from the get go, because I had to do that for my vanilla job anyway. 

And so one of the best pieces of advice I can give to any model is pay attention to what is working for you in terms of what is making you money. But also don't let the money dictate what you do. If what you do is not making you feel good about you. Hmm. That, that is, that is good advice. Um, it kind of just real quick get onto that. 

I, as a trans model, um, have the ability to very quickly top in a scene without the need of putting on a strap on harness. And I am not a top. I don't enjoy topping, but I see my peers stopping. and I sometimes feel that I'm limiting my potential by saying no to those types of situations and not taking those shoots an opportunity, but like Sydney pointed out, if it's harmful to me to do that, then I shouldn't push myself to do that. 

[00:23:15] Matthew Holliday: right. 

[00:23:15] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah. And just because your peers do something doesn't mean you should do it because what works for one person may not work for another. Absolutely. I've I, I am a kind of dominant person on camera and, uh, I try every once in a while to be submissive just because I'm like, am I limiting myself? And then my fans see it? 

And they're like, what the fuck are you doing Sydney? this, isn't what we wanna see. Why are you being submissive? You're you're my mommy Dom. What's going on? Mommy's not submissive. 

[00:23:48] Matthew Holliday: Interesting. 

[00:23:49] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: And so once you're, once you really establish something with your fans, like, you know, give a a year or two to Cassie, if she was suddenly gonna top someone. 

Yeah. Her fans may like it, but her fans that really know and value and respect her may look and be like, you've said in the past, you don't like doing this, did you enjoy this? And if she even hesitates, they're gonna assume the answer is no. And that she's pushing herself to do something she doesn't wanna do. 

And at the end of the day, we're all humans and we gotta be kind to ourselves, cuz we're currently in a world that is increasingly unkind. And if we can only be kind to ourselves and that's the only kindness we get, then we definitely need to push ourselves to be more kind to ourselves, especially in a work environment. 

[00:24:41] Matthew Holliday: All right. Well, we've gone a little off. 

[00:24:43] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: I'm sorry. 

[00:24:44] Matthew Holliday: No worries. No worries. No worries. Like I said, 

[00:24:46] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: my God. I'm the worst about that? Oh, 

[00:24:49] Matthew Holliday: no. I said I wanted this to be a conversation, not an interrogation. Um, that would be a different type of content. And I don't know, maybe that's what the fans will tell me is they want an interrogation. 

[00:25:02] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: there's a fetish for that. 

[00:25:04] Matthew Holliday: no doubt. There's a fetish for everything. 

[00:25:06] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Mm-hmm 

[00:25:07] Matthew Holliday: Uh, I'm gonna need a writing crop and some rope 

[00:25:10] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: you don't even, all you need is to recreate like star wars, interrogation, tactics. Yeah. Yeah. Use Jedi mind 

[00:25:19] Matthew Holliday: is more expensive. Oh, I was thinking, I was thinking the scene where the droid goes into the room. 

[00:25:24] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah, but that like turned a lot of people on. In a weird, awkward, formative way people got turned on by that. I literally have a video from like 10 years ago where I am interrogating my best friend and I'm like, where's the rebel base. And, um, it sold for me like a month ago. And so it just kind of goes to show you, like, there is literally a fetish for anything and residual income will literally last you over a decade, at least 

[00:25:55] Matthew Holliday: All right. Back to the discussion on Vegas. So where is the center of adult work these days? 

[00:26:03] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: I wouldn't say that there is a center center. I think that there are different cities that exist that have different things to offer in terms of work. Um, for example, New York and the DMV area are both really high traffic areas for full service per or full service sex workers. Whereas Vegas. 

[00:26:27] Matthew Holliday: New York makes sense. Lots of money there, 

[00:26:29] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah. 

yeah, yeah, yeah. Whereas, 

[00:26:32] Matthew Holliday: politicians, 

[00:26:33] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: oh yeah. 

[00:26:34] Matthew Holliday: politicians. 

[00:26:35] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Oh yeah. Oh, there's people trying to regulate our bodies and take away the ability to legally work. They're all dipping their toes in and hiring escorts and oh yeah. Pro dos and mm-hmm um, but like Tampa, Orlando, those are good areas for fetish work. Whereas Vegas, I wouldn't say is a as good of a place for fetish work. 

Vegas, I think is a lot more hardcore. And then LA is a lot more hardcore and Miami's a lot more hardcore. And then you've even got like Prague, which is really good for hardcore. But I think that there is just different cities that kind of attract different types of people and different types of performers. 

And. Most of the cities I think are kind of transient in a way anyway. And so like, Vegas gets a lot of people visiting because who doesn't wanna come to Vegas. And so it's a really good place to be a sex worker in because we do get people that just come to visit. And then, oh, Hey, I, I think I actually wanna shoot a little bit while I'm here. 

Are you available? You know, or they, they come to, to Vegas and do a week at the brothels and then shoot it, shoot with people, you know? Um, I don't really think that there's a center necessarily. I, I will say transport is a little bit more centralized. Um, Vegas is a great place for it. Obviously there's some studios out in LA though. 

Performers are a little bit more scarce. Um, Florida is a good spot for transport. 

[00:28:09] Matthew Holliday: Interesting. 

[00:28:11] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah. And like also with transport, um, Chicago has like groupy productions producers out of there. Yeah. Groupies is kind of spread across all over. Yeah. And, and that's because they try to get like the up and comers, you know, meet them where they are. 

Yeah. Kinda scenario, which oddly enough, there's a lot of performers that I know in Chicago. Yeah. 

[00:28:35] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. 

[00:28:35] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: and so it, it really just varies. But I do think that a lot of people come to Vegas specifically to work. I mean, I shot with someone last month who comes out here once a year, she's here for two weeks and she shoots in those two weeks over a year's worth of content. 

[00:28:54] Matthew Holliday: Huh? 

[00:28:55] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah. 

[00:28:56] Matthew Holliday: I was, uh, who was I talking to? Um, I was talking to some, one of the photographers who came on. He goes to this summer thing. That's put on, oh, why can I not remember what it's called anyways? They bring in like 20 or 30 models, uh, art nude models up to erotic nude, uh, but not really video, just stills. 

And yeah, he runs his own, uh, Patreon type site and he says he shoots like a year's worth of content in that week and spends a bunch of money hiring the models and then, you know, puts it up, drips it out on the Baton over a year and then comes back every summer and does the same. 

[00:29:34] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Hmm. Yeah. I mean the way Cassie and I shoot isn't super different, but it's definitely not getting a year of content in a week or two 

[00:29:43] Matthew Holliday: That is a hard working week. 

[00:29:45] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I'll get a few months out of a single test, but. We both like to use our tests to their full extent, cuz very early on, I learned like, make sure you always have a backlog of content. 

And so I always have a backlog of content. Yeah, that's right. 

[00:30:04] Matthew Holliday: I had a, I I'm not leaving this in the podcast. 

That was like a one man BKI. 

[00:30:13] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Oh my God. 

[00:30:14] Matthew Holliday: he could just pop, pop, pop, pop, pop 

[00:30:17] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: He would've been so popular in the industry. Oh my God. 

[00:30:20] Matthew Holliday: he was not well hung, but 

[00:30:22] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: You know what, honestly, if you can give multiple pop shots yeah. In a sh during a day, it doesn't even matter if you're that hung or not. Mm-hmm I mean, yeah, no. One of my top selling boy, girl scenes is with a Dick that is very small compared to most porn dicks. 

Yeah. But he could pop and have amazing pop shots multiple times per day. Mm-hmm 

[00:30:45] Matthew Holliday: Interesting. 

[00:30:45] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: yeah, yeah. Yeah. I've got teams with below average 

[00:30:48] Matthew Holliday: Well see, now that now I may have to edit that. So I leave that in there. Damn it. Cause now it's useful. I have to edit that. So I'm not talking about yeah, cuz I imagine for hardcore that's the limiting thing, right? Is the guy's orgasm is the trouble 

[00:31:08] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: it is. Mm-hmm on the flip side though. Like when I shoot with CIS films or trans men, we're not worrying about pop shots. And so, and some, I guess, both trans women and cismen as well. Sometimes they are understanding enough of their own body and their ego doesn't get in the way where if we have to fake a come shot, we will, it's not ideal. 

And we try to avoid it. But if someone can't come like that's their body telling them that they shouldn't. And so we'll fake it and that's fine. 

[00:31:44] Matthew Holliday: Well, back to the location stuff, cuz we keep getting distracted. Uh, would you recommend an amateur try to move to a city to break in somewhere? Or would this be more like what you were talking about, where they should try and visit on a regular basis? Or maybe it sounds like visit a variety of places. 

[00:32:02] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: I, I would, I would steer them more towards visiting. Yeah. You know, property values are going up just about everywhere. Vegas is currently like one of the worst places yeah. For the inflation. So I would, I would highly suggest visiting first, especially in the beginning, because you may not blow up as quickly as you want. 

And moving to a new city 

[00:32:24] Matthew Holliday: Oh boy. 

[00:32:25] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Mm-hmm you know, so I would, I would say, stay where you are visit. If you can make that backlog that we're talking about, and once you're established more stable in your finances, move to a city, if you feel you need to. Yeah. I would say that moving to a city specifically. 

because it is a good hub for making porn is not always the best idea because unfortunately this job can be extremely isolating and moving to a new city is an isolating experience in and of itself. And then you throw in the extra isolation of working from home. Mm-hmm not knowing people. Yeah. That sort of thing. 

Yeah. Test the waters of a city before you decide to move there, because who knows, like a few, a few months ago, we shot with someone who was like, I'm thinking about moving here. And then we, we spent basically an entire week with him, um, for our content house. And by the end of the week, he's like, yeah, I'm moving here because he was here. 

He saw the potential of the numbers of people, he, or the, the types of people. He could work with the numbers of people he could work with. Yeah. And he started creating friendships so that he knew that when he came here, he would be okay. He would have a support system. He would have friends, he would not feel lonely. 

And that's, that's a big thing that a lot of sex workers deal with because this job is especially digital, very isolating . Yeah, 

[00:33:58] Matthew Holliday: Where do you most people shoot in Vegas? Cause I didn't hear either of you guys mention studios in Vegas, are there friendly studios in Vegas or is it mostly in people's houses? Ho uh, uh, apartments, 

[00:34:09] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: there are quite a few shoot houses here. 

[00:34:12] Matthew Holliday: shoot houses. 

[00:34:13] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yes. So yeah. So can, so it's just a, it's, it's a house, but it's no one lives in it. Yeah. Each room is just set up as a different set. Yeah. And you can film a lot of different themed videos with each of the rooms. Yeah. But there are studios here. I, I have gotten quite a bit of studio work. 

Although those studios will shoot out of a mixture of hotel rooms, shoot houses, apartments. It's just, whatever is available to them at the time. And whatever's most convenient. 

[00:34:44] Matthew Holliday: So a shoot house is like an Airbnb, but for video or photography work, 

[00:34:48] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: kind of they're, they're generally owned by like the actual studio companies. Whereas I feel like you might be asking about like studios that someone could rent, which there are like photo studios here. Mm-hmm photo bang. Bang is one of the, the more popular ones here and that one's. Should I just blanked on his name, but photo bang bangs here. 

and it's got, I wanna say six or seven different sets to me. I don't think I've seen a lot of video come out of photo bang, bang. I've mainly seen photo come out of photo bang, bang. 

[00:35:25] Matthew Holliday: Sorry, you mentioned the, uh, the photo studio. So I had the mental image of like a studio in a mall and 

[00:35:32] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: oh yeah. Glamor shot. 

[00:35:34] Matthew Holliday: pictures. And like, you can just hear in the next studio over, like, what is 

[00:35:43] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Local JC Penn. We, yeah, we Don. I don't even know if we still have like glamor shots or anything like that in any of our malls, but there are like local photo studios. Mm-hmm like photo bang, bang that are available to rent. And I wanna say, uh, the studio that kink shoots out of here in town is available for rent. There are places around town that you can rent out when Cassie and I were looking for a home to rent, we specifically wanted a home that was large enough that had other bedrooms we could shoot in aside from just our own. 

Because something I personally struggle with is I get bored of my surroundings and so I wanna change them. And so being able to shoot, we have three bedrooms that we can shoot in. We have a loft we can shoot in. And so I think a lot of people tend to do that same thing where they try to find a place that they could use as both a shooting area or a shooting studio of their own, but also a place to live. 

[00:36:56] Matthew Holliday: Mm. 

[00:36:57] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: People do get Airbnbs out here to shoot in. Um, they do. I used prior to the pandemic, I used to book hotel rooms once a month and I would just knock out a shitload of content on my own in a hotel room in an afternoon, order myself, some room service, watch some skin, a max, take a nap, go home. But yeah, 

[00:37:21] Matthew Holliday: I've definitely seen the Vegas. Cause the Vegas hotel rooms are usually pretty easy to spot cuz they always include the skyline as part of the video. 

[00:37:30] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yep, yep. Yeah. Yeah. It's definitely easy in some cases to recognize exactly which hotel people are. Yeah. You start, you start recognizing the wallpaper or the furniture. Yeah. Someone posted an elevator picture recently and I was like, I know where you're, just based off the elevator, the elevator. 

Yeah. 

[00:37:51] Matthew Holliday: So you mentioned, uh, going to hotel rooms or shooting at your house. How, how do you make it so that it doesn't look like you're just recording, you know, 10 videos in a row from the same location. Do you space out the release over time or do you do things to bury the background? 

[00:38:11] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Both well, so, so I, I have, I have absolutely looked at the outfits that I'm in the room that I'm shooting in and spaced out videos so that, you know, I'm not shooting or I'm not releasing a month's worth of videos that are all in the same spot. Um, so yes, backlog helps with that because you can move videos around and release them as you need to. 

But we do things like changing the curtains in the room, changing, changing the artwork, changing the bedding, changing the bedding. We, we, uh, I bought a set of, uh, lights that go through the RGB spectrum. And so we've started bouncing colored lights off the walls and, and illuminating curtains in a certain way. 

You know, it's, you could, you could ch you could change out the stuffed animals that are on the shelves, or, you know, whatever , um, there are ways to do this. And I, I think if someone is creative enough, They'll probably come up with some that we haven't thought of. Yeah. I mean, um, we've shot for folks or with folks who I wanna say once a month, they change up one of their sets kind of dramatically, not just like we're changing the curtains or we're changing the bedding, but they'll completely rearrange. 

They will hang new curtains. They will put up new bedding, but they'll also put new furniture in. They'll go to thrift stores and buy different props. They just switch things up as best as they can. And thrift stores are a great place to go, to get props, to get curtains, to get, be really cheap. And then you don't really care if it gets ruined because you paid what, $3 for it. 

Like, wow, I sold a video and it covered it. I'm not stressing you know what I, that just reminded me. I've I've seen people buy. Wallpaper. Yeah. You can buy removable wallpaper now. Yeah. That it's, it's pull and peel you stick it on. Yeah. And it's really easy to just pull off. Yeah. Yeah. And they just swap it up. 

There's also buying a background stand and buying a variety of backgrounds. Yep. Hanging curtains against a wall. Yep. It's it's very easy to switch things up. Um, For me, my, my OCD about switching things up also makes it a little difficult, difficult, cuz I'm five, two, and doing certain things on my own is complicated and difficult. 

Um, that's the real reason why we're dating it's it's so I can get things off the top shelf, 

but there there's a lot of ways that you can just very easily switch things up. And I see a lot of cam performers really innovating with how they redecorate their space every few weeks. Yeah. And I, I find it inspiring as hell to see like, there's this one performer, I forget her name, but she switches up her one corner that she shoots in monthly and she does these elaborate set designs in a corner of her bedroom. 

Yeah. And I'm just like, that's incredible. Impressive. And visually appealing that I have seen are usually camp performers. Yeah. 

[00:41:22] Matthew Holliday: Yeah, that makes sense. Cuz they've, they're always shooting from the same spot, 

[00:41:25] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Exactly. 

[00:41:26] Matthew Holliday: always in the same spot. 

[00:41:27] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Yep. But yeah, you know, there are, there are some Kim girl staples that I, I joke about seeing like the fairy lights with the fake vine leaves. Um, yeah, the, the draped curtains with the fair lights there, you're gonna hear a lot of fairy lights. I feel like um, But it's awesome. Like people are creating these intricate unique sets and they're just doing it based off things they can find at home goods at thrift stores at Ross, wherever. 

Yep. And in some cases like here in Vegas, we have, uh, I wanna say quarterly swaps where people bring clothing, props, furniture, even, and we just swap it out. And so it kind of is like repurposing things, giving things new life. And that's a huge help too, when you're able to have a community that, you know, I have sex furniture that technically I got from other performers. 

Yeah. 

[00:42:30] Matthew Holliday: Mm-hmm 

[00:42:31] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: And so it's just kind of being innovative, finding time and making a new set mm-hmm 

[00:42:38] Matthew Holliday: I've been wondering about how to draw the lines between the types of performers in my mind, I've been thinking of them as amateurs versus professionals, but that's not exactly right. As many of them that I've been thinking of amateurs are getting paid and when you're getting paid, you're a professional. 

And we talked about this a little bit before the podcast, and you guys had some ideas on this. 

[00:43:02] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Hmm. Yeah. Uh, so, so with the advent of only fans, uh, the porn landscape changed dramatically. Mm-hmm it stopped being so decentralized around studios and became possible to, uh, provide an independent, profitable professional income. Now not everyone is making $10,000 a month and only fans like the big names are, you know, sometimes you're getting. 

A hundred dollars a month, $200 a month, but you are getting paid. And like you said, that doesn't make you an amateur anymore. So what quickly we've, we've kind of come up with is that folks who are only fans only, or just a general fan site, only presence they're considered content creators. Um, typically content creators do not collaborate with other performers, although they may occasionally do that and there's problems surrounding that. 

But, um, that's, that's on them to figure out, but, um, content creators are not adult performers in my mind because adult performers we are aware of and hold fast to the federal regulations that dictate our industry to keep us safe, to make sure everyone's good and consenting and aware of what's happening. 

You know, things like. You know, you're being filmed for an adult scene. This isn't being strung, uh, sprung on you. Uh, you're not under the influence of any drugs or alcohol. Um, you were paid or compensated in some way for your performance. We have proper paperwork for you filled out with, you know, your name and information, so that if there's a problem, 10 years down the line from now, we're able to contact you and, and ensure that what you wrote in this paper is true and correct. 

Being a content creator, you don't really need to do that kind of stuff, cuz it's just you you're selling foot picks on only fans. You know, you don't need to fill out paperwork for yourself. In many ways, I look at it a little differently. Um, I think part of that is because I, I am looking at it through a vanilla world scope. 

Part of my marketing included booking influencers for campaigns and influencers often consider themselves content creators, and even a porn star you're creating content. And so I think in, in some ways, labeling someone as content creators can, it can be gate keep. And I don't like that, but I also understand the need to have those sorts of distinctions. 

Um, but I, I can still dislike it while understanding that, um, but I think that there is a very big difference between clip site, self producers, or clip site performers and fan site performers. And there are one of the biggest distinctions is. About a year ago, I was contacted by someone who was doing only fans as a side gig. 

And I inquired about his testing procedures because at the time I was very concerned about people's COVID testing as we all should be still myself included. Um, and he was like, oh, I'm, I'm only getting tested once a month. And I was like, well, industry standard is 15 days for STI testing. And at the time it was every three days for COVID. 

And I think that testing is definitely one of the biggest things that separates someone who is a fan site creator from someone who is. Taking this a little bit more seriously. And not to say that fan site creators, aren't taking it seriously. They're taking it seriously in a very different way and that's okay. 

Right. But the testing is to me, what makes or breaks someone from being maybe a hobbyist mm-hmm versus a professional and hobbyist? Still a weird term to use because in full service, that means something very different. yeah. That's, that's very different. I, I kinda mentioned it a little bit earlier, but when you're an only, fan's only creator, you aren't really inserting yourself into the industry enough to know those rules yeah. 

That we follow. And so you may not know that you need to be tested in order to perform with someone else. You may not know that you need a, uh, release from them to show consent and the absence of drug and alcohol onset. You know, you may not know these things because you're not inserting yourself into the industry far enough to, to know that. 

Yeah. It's not like the, the us government comes down and says, oh, Hey, I saw you made an only fans. Um, , here's the guidebook for creating pornography within the us. Um, they don't do that. You know, if, if you're not. If you're not part of the industry, you'd probably never figure that out. But something occurred to me as we were having this conversation, it used to be about professional versus amateur mm-hmm , you know, be before only fans. 

And you would see amateur as being not. In the studio, there was also a phenomenon that's still can still going on, but it started prior to only fans of ProAm. Mm, yeah. Professional amateurs. Yeah. And I think that term really picked up mainstream attention when that movie came out several years ago and I'm blanking on the name, but it focused on hussy models. 

Um, yeah, I can't think of the name of the documentary, but it was specifically talking about ProAm performers and how this one agency was at the time extremely predatory and putting people into situations. Basically it was, it was propaganda that was very anti porn, anti adult work mm-hmm . Um, but for me, I had never heard the term ProAm before that documentary. 

And I think that ProAm is a really great term actually, now that I'm thinking of it again, because there are people who yes, they are making money, but there also. It's not their only source of income. And so in some ways they are still an amateur about it because they are not, it's not paying their bills. 

Yeah. They're making money, but it's not their livelihood. And I, I like that term pro am because I do think it separates the people who are doing this just for funsies. The people that are true amateurs, who aren't doing this to make money, they're doing it for fame, for recognition, for exposure. And then you've got the people that, okay, they're dipping their toe in. 

They're seeing what kind of money they could make. Um, maybe they wanna take it more seriously, but they're not quite there yet. You know, once they're their income picks up, then they could quit their vanilla job or their day job and dedicate this into being a full-time professional. Industry or professional career for them? 

I don't know why. I didn't think of that term before. I've I've also seen a lot of gate keeping around the term porn star. Yeah. Um, now, now I, I consider myself to be a porn star because I'm on the cover of a DVD that you can buy at your local sex shop. 

[00:50:23] Matthew Holliday: Ooh. 

[00:50:24] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: But, um, you know, some people say, well, you're not a real porn star until you win an award. 

Or you're not a real porn star until you're on the cover of a, a DVD, or you're not a real porn star until you've been in a, a porn parody of something. What, whatever line they choose to draw suddenly right now, porn star seems to be a gate kept term. It's. I've seen it be a gate kept term for quite a long time. 

Um, a few years ago, several years ago when I still lived in Florida at the time I had just been on a few DVD covers and I switched my Twitter bio to say that I was a porn star. And someone was like, you're not a porn star. You've been doing this at the time for what? Eight years? Like, sorry, that's not, you're not a porn star. 

You haven't been in more than 50 productions. You haven't been in more than a hundred productions, whatever. And like, it's just very gate keep. But the fact of the matter is if you are performing in a, in a porn. If you are starring in a porn. Oh yeah. Especially if you're the starring talent, you are a porn star, you start in a porn 

[00:51:31] Matthew Holliday: Mm-hmm 

[00:51:32] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: and I, there's just a lot of gate keeping within this industry. 

And I recognize that I am not necessarily helping it by telling people you don't wanna do this job as much as you think you wanna do this job. Well, that's hard work, but it is. And within the industry, like I've been told that I'm not a, B, B w because I've never weighed more than 250 pounds. But if you ever look at any of my pictures from even day one of my career, I have always had a belly. 

I have always been fat. And it's just, there's always some sort of gate keeping within this industry. And it's really frustrating cause we're all supposed to be adults mm-hmm and who's to tell me I'm not a porn star. Who's to tell Cassie she's not a porn star. Yeah. Who's who's to make up these, these rules other than ourselves. 

And so unfortunately there is a lot of gate keeping. But 

[00:52:27] Matthew Holliday: So I ask this question all the time, but it's a timeless problem. Sketchy dudes. Do you have you have, do you have advice for amateur models who are being bombarded with content, producers, and photographers on how to screen out the serious ones versus the sketchy guys who just want to get their rocks off? 

[00:52:51] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Always ask them for references. And the reason you wanna ask them for references is yes, you can go around and ask the Mo or like look up the models that they've shot with, but by asking them, you are setting them up either for instant success or instant failure. Because if they say I don't have references. 

That's not a good look. Yeah. If they are willing to give you names, that is a good look and you should definitely contact those people, but then also contact other people. And the reason I say that is because generally speaking, a producer photographer, whatever is gonna give you references of people that they know will put in a good word for them. 

Yes . Whereas if you just contact other people that you've seen someone work with, you might learn some things that you wouldn't have known just by contacting the people that are AC that are referred 

[00:53:44] Matthew Holliday: Sounds like you should do both. 

[00:53:45] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: well. Oh, definitely. Yes. . Yes, because you may work with someone who you find out later is a piece of shit. 

And just because you've worked with someone doesn't mean that you're going to give them a positive review or encourage others to work with them. I have people that I've worked with that I would not recommend anyone else work with. But at the time, I thought they were safe enough for me to work with. 

And so it's important to talk to the people rather than just being like, oh, Cassie's worked with them. Yeah. They're good. Yeah. Just because someone has worked with someone does not mean that they endorse that person. Exactly. Yeah. But if someone messages me and it was like, Hey, I saw you worked, worked with this model. 

Could you share if it was a good experience, would you recommend them? Would you work with them again? Whatever questions my answer would be, no, I will not work with them again. And here's why. But a lot of models don't do that. Mm-hmm and that's scary to me because I know quite a bit about people from my own experiences and from experiences shared with me from my peers, because the only thing that we really can do, or one of the only things that we really can do to keep each other safe is issue warnings. 

But if we issue those warnings publicly, we're often viewed as too problematic to work with. And so connecting with peers is definitely one of the best things that any model can do to keep safe, because your peers are going to be the ones to let you know, this person is safe. This person is not safe. 

Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. I personally, I also like to ask for reference or not references. I'm sorry. I also personally like to ask for, um, examples of their work. Yes. Because I, I wanna know if they can act, I wanna know. How do they perform? I wanna know what's the quality of their lighting. What kind of camera do they use? 

Because if they're not making content that vibes well with the content that I make, then I don't think that we're gonna work out. I don't want content that looks like theirs. If it's bad. Yeah. I want content that looks good. I want content that will sell. I want content that people get excited about. And if it's dimly lit with a cell phone in a bathroom and you know, it's, you know, shooting a weird shower scene. 

So the audio's all fucked while the water runs. Like I don't, I don't want that. 

[00:56:09] Matthew Holliday: I had a follow up question on there. And I know that generally speaking, a first time, content producer would not be reaching out to you guys. You guys are pretty well known, although who knows they might. What 

[00:56:20] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: do. They do. They do. They do. They do 

[00:56:24] Matthew Holliday: all right. Well then, so maybe this is less hypothetical than I would've assumed. Uh, what could a first time content producer do to try and improve their bonafide to try and, you know, you know, their good intentions and that I'm not just, you know, trying to, trying to get you into my bedroom. If, if anything, maybe they can't. 

[00:56:48] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: so for me, I think that starting a conversation professionally is the best way to go. Yeah. Um, I think it's probably easier for me to tell you what people cannot do rather than what they can do. 

[00:57:00] Matthew Holliday: Yeah. 

[00:57:01] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: I've had people reach out to me, literally, this, this one person has reached out to me multiple times. 

And every time I say no, he peer pressures me and it feels gross, but he's like, Hey, I want to create in a romantic cream pie scene with you, he didn't include links to his work. He didn't include his name. He didn't include any information other than I want to create this particular scene with you at the time, I wasn't doing any hard. He didn't look into my, my work. He didn't know that about me. He just assumed that that's something that I would do that I would automatically know who he is. I have no idea who this dude is because the name he shared with me, it's not on porn hub. It's not on X videos. It's not on mini visits. It's not on Twitter. 

It's not on Instagram. There's no way to verify. And so I would say include your links. Be professional. Ask if someone even creates that type of content, none of us are mind readers, but assuming that we will know who someone is just based off a name is kind of ableist, which is shitty because someone like me, I have a really bad memory. 

I don't remember people's names. I struggle with that. I dunno what person is. And just expecting someone to know is not professional. Well, shit too. Like I've, I've not known who some big name performer is just because I'm not. In that circle. I'm not a fan of that type of content. Yeah. I don't work with performers who are in that circle. 

Like I never, would've heard of this person, but they're, they're big in, in their circles. Yeah. But I think for me, if you reach out to me and you're a first time producer, even if you don't have hardcore content with another performer, show me your solo stuff, show me if it's pictures, show me pictures. 

You've taken of nature or other models. Even if they're not nude, like just show me what work you do have to tell me that you are, you're not you, you know what you're doing? Yeah. Because I don't wanna show up and you'd be like, uh, well, I've got, I've got the ceiling light. Um, you know, I don't, don't, it's, it's a warm tone, I guess. 

um, you know, I don't want, I don't want that. I want, I want proper. Photography. Yeah. For any producer looking to book anyone, whether it is for a hardcore shoot for a photo shoot for a fetish shoot, introduce yourself politely. Mm-hmm, give, send links to where people can find your work. Ask if there is interest. 

So many people are just like, I would like to book you. And I get that. That is a psychological trick to get people to do what you want them to do, but it also creates a little bit of pressure. So someone who maybe is not super comfortable with saying no or not super comfortable with confrontation is going to feel pressure to automatically say yes, because someone didn't ask if that was of interest, um, You know, I get, I get asked by performers, do you collaborate with others? 

And that tells me right off the bat that no, they, they haven't looked at my work. like be aware of who you are contacting. Yeah. Know the per you don't have to be intimately aware of what they create. But all someone has to do is click on a mini vs link and they've, they'd have the answer. Do I collaborate with other people? 

Yeah. They don't even have to go that far. Just one swipe on Twitter, just one yeah. You know, know, know who we are and what we do, but then treat it like an interview. Yeah. I think is the best way to summarize, treat it like an interview. Yeah. Show us whatever type of resume you can because you're trying to get us on board. 

Yeah. So impress us. Yeah. Impress us. You're not just here to, to get your Dick wet. You're not just here to have sex. Like. if you want to be treated as a professional, if you wanna be taken seriously by your peers, you have to present yourself in a certain light, a professional light, a professional light. 

And I, I get a lot of people who are like, Hey, ma I'm in town. Can I come give you back shots? And I'm like, no, , I don't know shit about you, but you just turned me off so much so fast that like there's no professional recovery from this I am, I'm a professional. I am not here to fuck. Yeah. And yeah, that's a cool part of my job, but it's not why I'm here. 

Yeah. Mm-hmm , I'm here to create, I'm here to run a business. I'm here to be creative and sex is to be honest, a very small part of why I am in this business. Very small . And so by coming out the gate as professional as possible, it just sets someone else up as up for success. 

[01:01:57] Matthew Holliday: All right. Well, I think we are just about out of time. So Cassie, do you have any projects you wanna plug? 

[01:02:04] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: You can find any projects that I'm working on, uh, by going to Cassie Cummings, triplex.com or Cassie cummings.fans. And you can find me on Twitter at CAS Cummings, triple X. 

[01:02:16] Matthew Holliday: Awesome. Sydney, do you have any projects you wanna plug or tell people where to find you online? 

[01:02:21] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Uh, yeah. So I am working on shooting some of a series that I'm hoping to put together into a DVD layer this year. That is all about presenting all of the different bodies that I shoot with in a beautiful Sensu sexy light. I'm, I've got a name in mind. I'm not gonna plug it just in case, but , um, it's a project that I I've been pretty excited about for a minute. 

And I'm excited to do more shooting for that. Beyond that you can find me@sydneyscreens.com. Um, my Twitter is Sydney underscore screens. My Instagram is Sydney screams. If you would like to join my, my only fans or whichever fan site in case only fans does what it does, um, and kicks us off. Then Sydney screams fans.com will be redirected to whatever fan site I am present on. 

But yeah, just, just Google me, me. I'm a very Googleable name. and it's Sydney with a Y not an I. 

[01:03:24] Matthew Holliday: All right. Thank you both for coming on the podcast. 

[01:03:27] Sydney Screams and Cassie Cummings: Thank you. Yeah, appreciate being here. It was great. Ha great chatting. 

[01:03:31] Matthew Holliday: And with that, we are done. Check us out@thensfwphotographypodcast.com on Twitter is at an SFW photography, which turns out to have been super generic. I keep getting tagged on stuff that I'm not involved in because at an SFW photography is just super generic, Instagram at the NSFW photography podcast. 

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Sydney Screams Profile Photo

Sydney Screams

Model / Photographer

Sydney is a plus size pornstar and photographer with over 14 years in the adult industry under her belt. Sydney is an award nominated talent, best known for her fetish content, ranging from vore to futanari to sensual domination. As a photographer, Sydney's work has been displayed in art shows in the US & Australia, having won several "Best in Show" awards

Cassie Cummings Profile Photo

Cassie Cummings

Model

Cassie is a transgender pornstar and clip producer, new to the industry but already making waves. She has been nominated for Best New Face and Best Trans Clip Producer in just her first year. Cassie primarily focuses on hardcore content but also films fetish scenes when the mood strikes